Organic Food Consumption: An Insight Into Organic Consumers' Self Identities

Lyudmila Ilchevska

Student thesis: Master thesis

Abstract

Organic food has become increasingly popular in Ireland over the past few years. However, there is little or no research on the reasons behind organic food consumption apart from the well known motivational factors such as the belief that organic food is healthier and safer.
The purpose of this research is to provide a new perspective that relates to organic food consumption, one that stems from the notion of Consumer Culture Theory and the need for individuals to create meaning by reshaping their self identities. The research was focused around two main theories – McCracken’s notion of movement of meaning, which also includes consumers’ rituals as well as Belk’s concept of the self and extended self.
Through analyzing the findings of this research by taking an interpretivist approach and conducting five semi-structured interviews it was established that more research is needed in order to establish whether rituals were of any importance to organic food consumption. Furthermore, in regards to Belk’s notion of identity, it was determined that consumers’ self identity played a key role in regards to the consumption of organic food.

EducationsMSocSc in Management of Creative Business Processes , (Graduate Programme) Final Thesis
LanguageEnglish
Publication date2018
Number of pages105
SupervisorsBoris Uzelac