Users’ Perceived Advertising Value Across Mobile Social Media – a Quantitative Study

Alexandru - Cătălin Lascăr & Tomás Mladý

Student thesis: Master thesis

Abstract

Purpose – Mobile social media embody a crucial advertising channel, as the messages can be tailored down not solely based on users’ profiles and interests, yet on the location. Past research dealt with perceived social media and/or mobile advertising holistically, hence a cross-platform comparison of social media types in the mobile context has been the main aim of the authors expressed by the current research study. Therefore, this thesis set out to measure the perceived value of social networking sites and media sharing sites advertising in the mobile context.
Methodology – This research acquires a quantitative study and examines the advertising value perceptions and consumers’ attitudes towards advertising across mobile social networking sites and media sharing sites. As representatives for each of the mobile social media, Facebook and Instagram were chosen. The primary data are collected through questionnaire and the sample represents European users of both mobile Facebook and Instagram. Data analysis is conducted as hypothesis testing method and SPSS is used as the statistical analysis tool.
Findings – Results indicate informativeness and entertainment equally predict the perceived advertising value on social networking sites, while on media sharing sites informativeness is the salient factor in predicting the value. Both irritation and credibility have the least impact on the value. In the attitudes formation, advertising value has the ultimate role, followed by informativeness. Credibility and entertainment do not significantly impact consumers’ attitudes towards advertising.
Future research – The current study uses the advertising value theory. However, the incorporation of different constructs may provide different insights in respect to consumers perceptions of advertising value.

EducationsMSc in Business Administration and E-business, (Graduate Programme) Final Thesis
LanguageEnglish
Publication date2017
Number of pages97
SupervisorsChee-Wee Tan