It's a Woman's Job: Exploring Creativity and Gender

Sasha Talaii Olesen

Student thesis: Master thesis

Abstract

The under-representation of women in the creative industries is argued to represent gender inequality and has in many cases been partly attributed to creativity and masculinity being interconnected as one. In order to increase knowledge of the embeddedness of this phenomenon, this master’s thesis explores how understandings of creativity are constructed and the ways in which gender intersects with these understandings from the perspective of students. Additionally, the aim is to examine how these understandings interact with their career prospects and ambitions.
Existing literature on gender identity in creativity are often situated in the industry. The implication is limited knowledge on the grasp of the phenomenon of masculine creativity and its effects on the formation of creativity understandings. This study addresses creativity and gender as discursive phenomena and is based on five semi- structured interviews of film students in the film director programme at the National Film School of Denmark, five secondary interviews of established Danish film directors, and three reports from the Danish Film Institute’s task force groups for gender diversity.
The master’s thesis argues that gender is especially important due to creativity understandings that emphasise a personal voice. It is observed that character traits within creativity are constructed as non-feminine and the study suggests gender inequality in creative output through feminist essentialism and standpoint theory. Overall, the study points to a lack of gender awareness amongst students which limits the scope of actions. The expected outcome is thus a re-production of gender roles and stereotypes. The research’s implications seek to contribute to the dialogue regarding creativity understandings and gender identity in the creative industries and highlight the importance of consciousness of gender.

EducationsMSocSc in Management of Creative Business Processes , (Graduate Programme) Final Thesis
LanguageEnglish
Publication date2017
Number of pages113
SupervisorsAna Maria Munar