Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

‘You can’t make an omelet without breaking some eggs’. This (in)famous maxim, variously attributed to Napoleon, Stalin and The Joker from Batman, has arguably found its way into development policies, which (in- or explicitly) subscribe to a pragmatic view of cost-benefit trade-offs (for very divergent views on this matter, see e.g. Jackson, 2016; Owusu, 2003). However, the questions of who’s eggs to break and who will get the omelet haunt economic development initiatives as a seemingly irresolvable paradox of generalized growth versus localized impact. Which it will be all comes down to the specifics of policy, just as policy makers continue to search for a way out of the dilemma – seeking to ensure that everyone can have their eggs and eat them too, as it were.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2019
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019: What Now? International Business in a Confused World Order - University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Dec 201915 Dec 2019
Conference number: 45
https://eiba2019.eiba.org/

Conference

Conference45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019
Number45
LocationUniversity of Leeds
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period13/12/201915/12/2019
Internet address

Bibliographical note

CBS Library does not have access to the material

Cite this

Haakonsson, S. J. (2019). Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains. Paper presented at 45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019, Leeds, United Kingdom.
Haakonsson, Stine Jessen. / Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains. Paper presented at 45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019, Leeds, United Kingdom.11 p.
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Haakonsson, SJ 2019, 'Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains' Paper presented at, Leeds, United Kingdom, 13/12/2019 - 15/12/2019, .

Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains. / Haakonsson, Stine Jessen.

2019. Paper presented at 45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019, Leeds, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Haakonsson SJ. Who’s Omelet? Linking Malawi’s Agricultural Sector to Global Value Chains. 2019. Paper presented at 45th EIBA Annual Conference 2019, Leeds, United Kingdom.