When Oil and Wind Turbine Companies Make Green Sense Together

Lise Backer

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this article I contribute to descriptive green business research on how processes of eco‐effective greening business unfold in practical reality. I look into the case of the increasing interaction between the multinational oil company Shell and the world's largest wind turbine company Vestas. I draw on descriptive organizational sense‐making theory and analyse to this end the shared green sense‐making of Shell and Vestas on off‐shore wind energy business. The article concludes that greening companies such as Shell – that are not born green – might be considerably advanced if these companies strengthen their relationships with companies such as Vestas – that are born green. This is so since companies that are born green have strong green ecocentric business beliefs that can function as important engines in shared green sense‐making with companies that are not born green and have more hesitant green beliefs. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBusiness Strategy and the Environment
Volume18
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
ISSN0964-4733
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

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When Oil and Wind Turbine Companies Make Green Sense Together. / Backer, Lise.

In: Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2009, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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