The Perceived Influence of Employee Board Members on Decisions in Denmark and Norway

Caspar Rose*, Inger Marie Hagen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Codetermination through board-level employee representation has a long tradition in Denmark and Norway. Since employee representatives are in a minority on the board, do they have a real say in decisions? Using survey data, we find a relatively large proportion of employee representatives who state that they have little or no influence on the decision-making process. A small minority claim to have significant influence on major strategic issues such as company restructuring. Neither gender nor length of board membership is related to perceived influence, which is also the case for board size. However, the more frequent the board meetings, the higher the level of perceived influence. The findings suggest that the present system does not empower board-level employee representatives.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Industrial Relations
Volume25
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)247–260
Number of pages14
ISSN0959-6801
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • Board-level employee representatives
  • Corporate governance
  • Decision-making
  • Denmark
  • Influence
  • Norway

Cite this

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abstract = "Codetermination through board-level employee representation has a long tradition in Denmark and Norway. Since employee representatives are in a minority on the board, do they have a real say in decisions? Using survey data, we find a relatively large proportion of employee representatives who state that they have little or no influence on the decision-making process. A small minority claim to have significant influence on major strategic issues such as company restructuring. Neither gender nor length of board membership is related to perceived influence, which is also the case for board size. However, the more frequent the board meetings, the higher the level of perceived influence. The findings suggest that the present system does not empower board-level employee representatives.",
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The Perceived Influence of Employee Board Members on Decisions in Denmark and Norway. / Rose, Caspar; Marie Hagen, Inger.

In: European Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 25, No. 3, 09.2019, p. 247–260.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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