The Organizational Design of Offshoring

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The general research question guiding this thesis is: What are the organizational consequences of offshoring? Increasingly firms are becoming caught up by the “harsh realities of offshoring” (Aron and Singh, 2005: 135). Many firms have begun to realize that managing an increasingly globally dispersed organization is more difficult and costly than initially expected (Dibbern et al., 2008; Stringfellow et al., 2008). In particular, decision makers often fail to accurately estimate the costs of offshoring and are therefore surprised by unexpected costs of implementing offshoring decisions. Accordingly, the overall purpose of this thesis is to investigate why some firms fail when offshoring and others do not. To accomplish this, offshoring is conceptualized as an organizational reconfiguration which requires firms to coordinate and integrate geographically dispersed activities across distances. In this respect, a number of questions arise. For example, how does the added distance between the organizational activities signified by offshoring impact task interdependencies and performance? How do bounded rational decision makers account for and plan the organizational change from co-location to international dispersion? How do firms accumulate architectural knowledge so that efficient design decisions can be taken when relocating certain activities to foreign locations?
    The general research question guiding this thesis is: What are the organizational consequences of offshoring? Increasingly firms are becoming caught up by the “harsh realities of offshoring” (Aron and Singh, 2005: 135). Many firms have begun to realize that managing an increasingly globally dispersed organization is more difficult and costly than initially expected (Dibbern et al., 2008; Stringfellow et al., 2008). In particular, decision makers often fail to accurately estimate the costs of offshoring and are therefore surprised by unexpected costs of implementing offshoring decisions. Accordingly, the overall purpose of this thesis is to investigate why some firms fail when offshoring and others do not. To accomplish this, offshoring is conceptualized as an organizational reconfiguration which requires firms to coordinate and integrate geographically dispersed activities across distances. In this respect, a number of questions arise. For example, how does the added distance between the organizational activities signified by offshoring impact task interdependencies and performance? How do bounded rational decision makers account for and plan the organizational change from co-location to international dispersion? How do firms accumulate architectural knowledge so that efficient design decisions can be taken when relocating certain activities to foreign locations?
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business : Local Contexts in Global Business
    EditorsKlaus Meyer, Tunga Kiyak
    Place of PublicationEast Lansing, MI
    PublisherAcademy of International Business
    Date2014
    Pages56
    StatePublished - 2014
    EventAIB 2014 Annual Meeting : Local Context in Global Business - Westin Bayshore, Vancouver, Canada
    Duration: 23 Jun 201426 Jun 2014
    Conference number: 56
    http://aib.msu.edu/events/2014/

    Conference

    ConferenceAIB 2014 Annual Meeting
    Number56
    LocationWestin Bayshore
    CountryCanada
    CityVancouver
    Period23/06/201426/06/2014
    Internet address
    SeriesAcademy of International Business. Annual Meeting. Proceedings
    Volume2014
    ISSN2078-4430

    Cite this

    Larsen, M. M. (2014). The Organizational Design of Offshoring. In K. Meyer, & T. Kiyak (Eds.), Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business (pp. 56). East Lansing, MI: Academy of International Business. Academy of International Business. Annual Meeting. Proceedings, Vol.. 2014
    Larsen, Marcus M. . / The Organizational Design of Offshoring. Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business. editor / Klaus Meyer ; Tunga Kiyak. East Lansing, MI : Academy of International Business, 2014. pp. 56 (Academy of International Business. Annual Meeting. Proceedings, ???volume??? 2014).
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    title = "The Organizational Design of Offshoring",
    abstract = "The general research question guiding this thesis is: What are the organizational consequences of offshoring? Increasingly firms are becoming caught up by the “harsh realities of offshoring” (Aron and Singh, 2005: 135). Many firms have begun to realize that managing an increasingly globally dispersed organization is more difficult and costly than initially expected (Dibbern et al., 2008; Stringfellow et al., 2008). In particular, decision makers often fail to accurately estimate the costs of offshoring and are therefore surprised by unexpected costs of implementing offshoring decisions. Accordingly, the overall purpose of this thesis is to investigate why some firms fail when offshoring and others do not. To accomplish this, offshoring is conceptualized as an organizational reconfiguration which requires firms to coordinate and integrate geographically dispersed activities across distances. In this respect, a number of questions arise. For example, how does the added distance between the organizational activities signified by offshoring impact task interdependencies and performance? How do bounded rational decision makers account for and plan the organizational change from co-location to international dispersion? How do firms accumulate architectural knowledge so that efficient design decisions can be taken when relocating certain activities to foreign locations?",
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    Larsen, MM 2014, The Organizational Design of Offshoring. in K Meyer & T Kiyak (eds), Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business. Academy of International Business, East Lansing, MI, Academy of International Business. Annual Meeting. Proceedings, vol. 2014, pp. 56, Vancouver, Canada, 23/06/2014.

    The Organizational Design of Offshoring. / Larsen, Marcus M. .

    Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business. ed. / Klaus Meyer; Tunga Kiyak. East Lansing, MI : Academy of International Business, 2014. p. 56.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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    AB - The general research question guiding this thesis is: What are the organizational consequences of offshoring? Increasingly firms are becoming caught up by the “harsh realities of offshoring” (Aron and Singh, 2005: 135). Many firms have begun to realize that managing an increasingly globally dispersed organization is more difficult and costly than initially expected (Dibbern et al., 2008; Stringfellow et al., 2008). In particular, decision makers often fail to accurately estimate the costs of offshoring and are therefore surprised by unexpected costs of implementing offshoring decisions. Accordingly, the overall purpose of this thesis is to investigate why some firms fail when offshoring and others do not. To accomplish this, offshoring is conceptualized as an organizational reconfiguration which requires firms to coordinate and integrate geographically dispersed activities across distances. In this respect, a number of questions arise. For example, how does the added distance between the organizational activities signified by offshoring impact task interdependencies and performance? How do bounded rational decision makers account for and plan the organizational change from co-location to international dispersion? How do firms accumulate architectural knowledge so that efficient design decisions can be taken when relocating certain activities to foreign locations?

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    Larsen MM. The Organizational Design of Offshoring. In Meyer K, Kiyak T, editors, Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business. East Lansing, MI: Academy of International Business. 2014. p. 56. (Academy of International Business. Annual Meeting. Proceedings, Vol. 2014).