The New Story of Changing: Exploring Dichotomies in the Field of Organizational Change

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article theoretically explores and unpacks existing dichotomies in the field of organizational change. By revisiting the dichotomies “planned-emergent change” and “major-minor change,” the article finds that only relying on one extreme of a dichotomy gives a too simplistic view on change in organizations. Instead, the article proceeds by combining the two dichotomies and further explores the exceptions: the studies that do not only rely on one extreme of the dichotomies but instead moves along dichotomies. Based on the findings, the article suggests that future studies of organizational changes take an emic approach and study organizational changes in situ in order to capture the vividness of organizational changes.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Knowledge, Culture & Change in Organizations: Annual Review
Volume19
Pages (from-to)7-16
Number of pages10
ISSN1447-9524
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

CBS Library does not have access to the material

Cite this

@article{ea1bcb15a17a45338b76018b312656c6,
title = "The New Story of Changing: Exploring Dichotomies in the Field of Organizational Change",
abstract = "This article theoretically explores and unpacks existing dichotomies in the field of organizational change. By revisiting the dichotomies “planned-emergent change” and “major-minor change,” the article finds that only relying on one extreme of a dichotomy gives a too simplistic view on change in organizations. Instead, the article proceeds by combining the two dichotomies and further explores the exceptions: the studies that do not only rely on one extreme of the dichotomies but instead moves along dichotomies. Based on the findings, the article suggests that future studies of organizational changes take an emic approach and study organizational changes in situ in order to capture the vividness of organizational changes.",
author = "Signe Bruskin",
note = "CBS Library does not have access to the material",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.18848/1447-9524/CGP/v19i01/7-16",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "7--16",
journal = "International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management",
issn = "1447-9524",
publisher = "Common Ground Publishing",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The New Story of Changing

T2 - Exploring Dichotomies in the Field of Organizational Change

AU - Bruskin, Signe

N1 - CBS Library does not have access to the material

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - This article theoretically explores and unpacks existing dichotomies in the field of organizational change. By revisiting the dichotomies “planned-emergent change” and “major-minor change,” the article finds that only relying on one extreme of a dichotomy gives a too simplistic view on change in organizations. Instead, the article proceeds by combining the two dichotomies and further explores the exceptions: the studies that do not only rely on one extreme of the dichotomies but instead moves along dichotomies. Based on the findings, the article suggests that future studies of organizational changes take an emic approach and study organizational changes in situ in order to capture the vividness of organizational changes.

AB - This article theoretically explores and unpacks existing dichotomies in the field of organizational change. By revisiting the dichotomies “planned-emergent change” and “major-minor change,” the article finds that only relying on one extreme of a dichotomy gives a too simplistic view on change in organizations. Instead, the article proceeds by combining the two dichotomies and further explores the exceptions: the studies that do not only rely on one extreme of the dichotomies but instead moves along dichotomies. Based on the findings, the article suggests that future studies of organizational changes take an emic approach and study organizational changes in situ in order to capture the vividness of organizational changes.

U2 - 10.18848/1447-9524/CGP/v19i01/7-16

DO - 10.18848/1447-9524/CGP/v19i01/7-16

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 7

EP - 16

JO - International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management

JF - International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management

SN - 1447-9524

ER -