The Logistics Triad: Survey ad Case Study Results

Paul D. Larson, Britta Gammelgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The article focuses on logistics triads, which comprise buyers, suppliers, and logistics service providers. Evidence is drawn from the transportation and logistics literature, a recent survey of logistics firms, and two real-world logistics triad cases. A logistics triad is made up of a buyer of goods, a supplier of those goods, and a logistics service provider (LSP). Close cooperation between the buyer and supplier could lead to plans to bring a carrier in on the collaboration, for further performance improvement. The purpose of this article is to report recent research results on logistics triads. Evidence is drawn from a survey of Danish LSPs and two cases of logistics practice. The second section defines the logistics triad and discusses triad benefits, facilitators, and barriers. In the third section, design, administration, and results of a survey of LSPs are presented. Then, the fourth section describes two logistics triad examples from industry. The fifth and final section discusses implications for transportation and logistics management.
Original languageEnglish
JournalTransportation Journal
Volume41
Issue number2-3
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
ISSN0041-1612
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Cite this

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The Logistics Triad : Survey ad Case Study Results. / Larson, Paul D.; Gammelgaard, Britta.

In: Transportation Journal, Vol. 41, No. 2-3, 2001, p. 71-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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