The Lisbon Strategy and the Alignment of Economic and Social Concerns

Magnus Paulsen Hansen, Peter Triantafillo

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines the economic and social thought that has evolved around the Lisbon strategy, which aimed to turn the European Union into the world’s most competitive knowledge economy by 2010. It argues that a new regime of rationality has emerged in which economic and social objectives, which were previously thought to be at odds with one another, have become increasingly aligned. The supposed antinomy between economic efficiency and social security has been gradually replaced by a Rawlsian-inspired understanding of social justice in which the individual right to self-development and employment is seen to go hand-in-hand with economic innovation and competitiveness. This alignment, which is expressed through the worshipping of the Nordic welfare model in general and the notion of flexicurity in particular, seems to have a strong depoliticizing effect.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of European Social Policy
Volume21
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)197–209
ISSN0958-9287
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Hansen, Magnus Paulsen ; Triantafillo, Peter. / The Lisbon Strategy and the Alignment of Economic and Social Concerns. In: Journal of European Social Policy. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 197–209.
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The Lisbon Strategy and the Alignment of Economic and Social Concerns. / Hansen, Magnus Paulsen; Triantafillo, Peter.

In: Journal of European Social Policy, Vol. 21, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 197–209.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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