The Construal (In)compatibility Effect: The Moderating Role of a Creative Mind-Set

Xiaojing Yang, Torsten Ringberg, Huifang Mao, Laura A. Peracchio

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind-set prefer information that is more remotely (closely) associated with their mental construal and appears novel (familiar).
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume38
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)681-696
ISSN0093-5301
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • Persuasion
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Creative Ability
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Novelty

Cite this

Yang, Xiaojing ; Ringberg, Torsten ; Mao, Huifang ; Peracchio, Laura A. . / The Construal (In)compatibility Effect : The Moderating Role of a Creative Mind-Set. In: Journal of Consumer Research. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 681-696.
@article{e078916a454b49599542d85544b7d4a6,
title = "The Construal (In)compatibility Effect: The Moderating Role of a Creative Mind-Set",
abstract = "This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind-set prefer information that is more remotely (closely) associated with their mental construal and appears novel (familiar).",
keywords = "Advertising, Persuasion, Consumer Behavior, Creative Ability, Marketing Strategy, Novelty",
author = "Xiaojing Yang and Torsten Ringberg and Huifang Mao and Peracchio, {Laura A.}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1086/660118",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "681--696",
journal = "Journal of Consumer Research",
issn = "0093-5301",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

The Construal (In)compatibility Effect : The Moderating Role of a Creative Mind-Set. / Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang; Peracchio, Laura A. .

In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 38, No. 4, 2011, p. 681-696.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

T2 - The Moderating Role of a Creative Mind-Set

AU - Yang, Xiaojing

AU - Ringberg, Torsten

AU - Mao, Huifang

AU - Peracchio, Laura A.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind-set prefer information that is more remotely (closely) associated with their mental construal and appears novel (familiar).

AB - This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind-set prefer information that is more remotely (closely) associated with their mental construal and appears novel (familiar).

KW - Advertising

KW - Persuasion

KW - Consumer Behavior

KW - Creative Ability

KW - Marketing Strategy

KW - Novelty

U2 - 10.1086/660118

DO - 10.1086/660118

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 681

EP - 696

JO - Journal of Consumer Research

JF - Journal of Consumer Research

SN - 0093-5301

IS - 4

ER -