Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice

    Research output: Working paperResearch

    Abstract

    Production and transfer of knowledge between social scientists and commercial companies in learning partnerships are filled with misunderstandings and unfulfilled expectations. This paper analyzes the duality of learning partnerships in single case studies. It discusses the two distinct sets of expectations and interests in production and transfer of knowledge, and it suggests how the business partner as well as the social scientist may benefit from a partnership. To improve the processes and results (for both parties) in learning partnerships we argue that the social scientist must possess skills that distinguish her from the management consultant. We argue that the social scientist;s primary contribution to her business partner is conceptual framing of organizational phenomena. Finally, we make recommendations for handling duality in learning partnerships within organizational analysis.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationCopenhagen
    PublisherDepartment of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School
    Number of pages33
    Publication statusPublished - 1995
    SeriesWorking Paper / Intercultural Communication and Management
    Number3

    Cite this

    Morsing, M., & Vendelø, M. (1995). Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice. Copenhagen: Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School. Working Paper / Intercultural Communication and Management, No. 3
    Morsing, Mette ; Vendelø, Morten. / Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice. Copenhagen : Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School, 1995. (Working Paper / Intercultural Communication and Management; No. 3).
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    abstract = "Production and transfer of knowledge between social scientists and commercial companies in learning partnerships are filled with misunderstandings and unfulfilled expectations. This paper analyzes the duality of learning partnerships in single case studies. It discusses the two distinct sets of expectations and interests in production and transfer of knowledge, and it suggests how the business partner as well as the social scientist may benefit from a partnership. To improve the processes and results (for both parties) in learning partnerships we argue that the social scientist must possess skills that distinguish her from the management consultant. We argue that the social scientist;s primary contribution to her business partner is conceptual framing of organizational phenomena. Finally, we make recommendations for handling duality in learning partnerships within organizational analysis.",
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    Morsing, M & Vendelø, M 1995 'Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice' Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen.

    Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice. / Morsing, Mette; Vendelø, Morten.

    Copenhagen : Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School, 1995.

    Research output: Working paperResearch

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    Morsing M, Vendelø M. Seesawing between Social and Managerial Practice. Copenhagen: Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School. 1995.