Responsibility Attribution and Consumer Behaviour in the Light of the Bangladesh Factory Collapse

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The current fashion system is highly unsustainable, as continuous overproduction and overconsumption is contributing to environmental as well as social degradation. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between consumers’ perceived responsibility for the non-sustainability of the fashion industry, diffusion of responsibility between different actors, label knowledge and use, perceived external barriers and environmental apparel consumption. Theoretically, we combine the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Model with norm activation theory. We use a representative sample of young Swedish consumers for our analysis. Findings show that perceived personal responsibility as well as label knowledge and use enhance
    environmental apparel consumption. The small but significant negative effect of perceived responsibility diffusion on environmental apparel consumption indicates that responsibilities between relevant actors might have to be delegated more explicitly than it happens today.
    The current fashion system is highly unsustainable, as continuous overproduction and overconsumption is contributing to environmental as well as social degradation. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between consumers’ perceived responsibility for the non-sustainability of the fashion industry, diffusion of responsibility between different actors, label knowledge and use, perceived external barriers and environmental apparel consumption. Theoretically, we combine the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Model with norm activation theory. We use a representative sample of young Swedish consumers for our analysis. Findings show that perceived personal responsibility as well as label knowledge and use enhance
    environmental apparel consumption. The small but significant negative effect of perceived responsibility diffusion on environmental apparel consumption indicates that responsibilities between relevant actors might have to be delegated more explicitly than it happens today.

    Conference

    ConferenceThe 39th Annual Macromarketing Conference. 2014
    Number39
    LocationRoyal Holloway, University of London
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityLondon
    Period02/07/201405/07/2014
    Internet address

    Cite this

    @article{82114853c45447cf81d8d31532096422,
    title = "Responsibility Attribution and Consumer Behaviour in the Light of the Bangladesh Factory Collapse",
    abstract = "The current fashion system is highly unsustainable, as continuous overproduction and overconsumption is contributing to environmental as well as social degradation. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between consumers’ perceived responsibility for the non-sustainability of the fashion industry, diffusion of responsibility between different actors, label knowledge and use, perceived external barriers and environmental apparel consumption. Theoretically, we combine the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Model with norm activation theory. We use a representative sample of young Swedish consumers for our analysis. Findings show that perceived personal responsibility as well as label knowledge and use enhanceenvironmental apparel consumption. The small but significant negative effect of perceived responsibility diffusion on environmental apparel consumption indicates that responsibilities between relevant actors might have to be delegated more explicitly than it happens today.",
    author = "Tina Mueller and Wencke Gwozdz and Lucia Reisch",
    year = "2015",
    doi = "10.1177/0276146714550875",
    language = "English",
    volume = "35",
    pages = "144",
    journal = "Journal of Macromarketing",
    issn = "0276-1467",
    publisher = "Sage Publications, Inc.",
    number = "1",

    }

    Responsibility Attribution and Consumer Behaviour in the Light of the Bangladesh Factory Collapse. / Mueller, Tina; Gwozdz, Wencke; Reisch, Lucia.

    In: Journal of Macromarketing, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2015, p. 144.

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

    TY - ABST

    T1 - Responsibility Attribution and Consumer Behaviour in the Light of the Bangladesh Factory Collapse

    AU - Mueller,Tina

    AU - Gwozdz,Wencke

    AU - Reisch,Lucia

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - The current fashion system is highly unsustainable, as continuous overproduction and overconsumption is contributing to environmental as well as social degradation. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between consumers’ perceived responsibility for the non-sustainability of the fashion industry, diffusion of responsibility between different actors, label knowledge and use, perceived external barriers and environmental apparel consumption. Theoretically, we combine the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Model with norm activation theory. We use a representative sample of young Swedish consumers for our analysis. Findings show that perceived personal responsibility as well as label knowledge and use enhanceenvironmental apparel consumption. The small but significant negative effect of perceived responsibility diffusion on environmental apparel consumption indicates that responsibilities between relevant actors might have to be delegated more explicitly than it happens today.

    AB - The current fashion system is highly unsustainable, as continuous overproduction and overconsumption is contributing to environmental as well as social degradation. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between consumers’ perceived responsibility for the non-sustainability of the fashion industry, diffusion of responsibility between different actors, label knowledge and use, perceived external barriers and environmental apparel consumption. Theoretically, we combine the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Model with norm activation theory. We use a representative sample of young Swedish consumers for our analysis. Findings show that perceived personal responsibility as well as label knowledge and use enhanceenvironmental apparel consumption. The small but significant negative effect of perceived responsibility diffusion on environmental apparel consumption indicates that responsibilities between relevant actors might have to be delegated more explicitly than it happens today.

    U2 - 10.1177/0276146714550875

    DO - 10.1177/0276146714550875

    M3 - Conference abstract in journal

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    JO - Journal of Macromarketing

    T2 - Journal of Macromarketing

    JF - Journal of Macromarketing

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