Queering Hospitality

Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

With this abstract we’re a team of researchers all affiliated with the Diversity and Difference Business in Society Platform at Copenhagen Business School (CBS) who’d like to propose a 1.5hr long workshop dedicated to exploring the hopeful possibilities of queering hospitality. We are, in that regard, less concerned with criticising what is in terms of excluding ‘welcoming’ practices that already exist; rather, what we want to do is to nurture and care for what could be by means of imagining what queered hospitality would look like, feel like, perhaps even smell, taste and sound like. To invoke this imaginary of a future desired place to be we take inspiration from recent movements in other fields of study (e.g. the project ‘Queering Accounting’) and norm-critical methods (e.g., Christensen 2018). Queering, in this regard, is not limited to the task of rendering queer or LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lives visible to for example hospitality or event managers. This is but one aspect of queer matters, which are all about being at odds with dominant norms that render certain (groups of) people, their needs, dreams and wishes for the future invisible to management. How can we break with the idea, the norm of welcoming practices being universally hospitable to all? And how can we re-imagine, even envisioning tourism and hospitality through queer perspectives? These and other emerging questions are to be addressed during the workshop, whose intended outcome is a collectively co-created manifesto. Our aim is to get the manifesto published in a relevant journal as a call to action for research and practice avenues that can lead if not all then some of the way to a hopeful and queered hospitality future.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Tourism Studies Proceedings : CTS 2019
EditorsKellee Caton
Number of pages1
Place of PublicationKamloops
PublisherThompson Rivers University
Publication date2019
Article number3
ISBN (Print)9780991687121
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event8th Critical Tourism Studies Conference 2019 - Ibiza, Spain
Duration: 24 Jun 201928 Jun 2019
Conference number: 8
https://www.criticaltourismstudies.info/

Conference

Conference8th Critical Tourism Studies Conference 2019
Number8
CountrySpain
CityIbiza
Period24/06/201928/06/2019
Internet address

Cite this

Friis Christensen, J., Munar, A. M., Villeséche, F., Eger, C., & Benali, A. (2019). Queering Hospitality: Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative? In K. Caton (Ed.), Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings: CTS 2019 [3] Kamloops: Thompson Rivers University.
@inbook{005860c99bb3440cb161143fb7c48a8a,
title = "Queering Hospitality: Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative?",
abstract = "With this abstract we’re a team of researchers all affiliated with the Diversity and Difference Business in Society Platform at Copenhagen Business School (CBS) who’d like to propose a 1.5hr long workshop dedicated to exploring the hopeful possibilities of queering hospitality. We are, in that regard, less concerned with criticising what is in terms of excluding ‘welcoming’ practices that already exist; rather, what we want to do is to nurture and care for what could be by means of imagining what queered hospitality would look like, feel like, perhaps even smell, taste and sound like. To invoke this imaginary of a future desired place to be we take inspiration from recent movements in other fields of study (e.g. the project ‘Queering Accounting’) and norm-critical methods (e.g., Christensen 2018). Queering, in this regard, is not limited to the task of rendering queer or LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lives visible to for example hospitality or event managers. This is but one aspect of queer matters, which are all about being at odds with dominant norms that render certain (groups of) people, their needs, dreams and wishes for the future invisible to management. How can we break with the idea, the norm of welcoming practices being universally hospitable to all? And how can we re-imagine, even envisioning tourism and hospitality through queer perspectives? These and other emerging questions are to be addressed during the workshop, whose intended outcome is a collectively co-created manifesto. Our aim is to get the manifesto published in a relevant journal as a call to action for research and practice avenues that can lead if not all then some of the way to a hopeful and queered hospitality future.",
author = "{Friis Christensen}, Jannick and Munar, {Ana Maria} and Florence Villes{\'e}che and Claudia Eger and Amira Benali",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780991687121",
editor = "Kellee Caton",
booktitle = "Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings",
publisher = "Thompson Rivers University",

}

Friis Christensen, J, Munar, AM, Villeséche, F, Eger, C & Benali, A 2019, Queering Hospitality: Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative? in K Caton (ed.), Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings: CTS 2019., 3, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, Ibiza, Spain, 24/06/2019.

Queering Hospitality : Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative? / Friis Christensen, Jannick; Munar, Ana Maria; Villeséche, Florence ; Eger, Claudia; Benali, Amira.

Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings: CTS 2019. ed. / Kellee Caton. Kamloops : Thompson Rivers University, 2019. 3.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Queering Hospitality

T2 - Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative?

AU - Friis Christensen, Jannick

AU - Munar, Ana Maria

AU - Villeséche, Florence

AU - Eger, Claudia

AU - Benali, Amira

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - With this abstract we’re a team of researchers all affiliated with the Diversity and Difference Business in Society Platform at Copenhagen Business School (CBS) who’d like to propose a 1.5hr long workshop dedicated to exploring the hopeful possibilities of queering hospitality. We are, in that regard, less concerned with criticising what is in terms of excluding ‘welcoming’ practices that already exist; rather, what we want to do is to nurture and care for what could be by means of imagining what queered hospitality would look like, feel like, perhaps even smell, taste and sound like. To invoke this imaginary of a future desired place to be we take inspiration from recent movements in other fields of study (e.g. the project ‘Queering Accounting’) and norm-critical methods (e.g., Christensen 2018). Queering, in this regard, is not limited to the task of rendering queer or LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lives visible to for example hospitality or event managers. This is but one aspect of queer matters, which are all about being at odds with dominant norms that render certain (groups of) people, their needs, dreams and wishes for the future invisible to management. How can we break with the idea, the norm of welcoming practices being universally hospitable to all? And how can we re-imagine, even envisioning tourism and hospitality through queer perspectives? These and other emerging questions are to be addressed during the workshop, whose intended outcome is a collectively co-created manifesto. Our aim is to get the manifesto published in a relevant journal as a call to action for research and practice avenues that can lead if not all then some of the way to a hopeful and queered hospitality future.

AB - With this abstract we’re a team of researchers all affiliated with the Diversity and Difference Business in Society Platform at Copenhagen Business School (CBS) who’d like to propose a 1.5hr long workshop dedicated to exploring the hopeful possibilities of queering hospitality. We are, in that regard, less concerned with criticising what is in terms of excluding ‘welcoming’ practices that already exist; rather, what we want to do is to nurture and care for what could be by means of imagining what queered hospitality would look like, feel like, perhaps even smell, taste and sound like. To invoke this imaginary of a future desired place to be we take inspiration from recent movements in other fields of study (e.g. the project ‘Queering Accounting’) and norm-critical methods (e.g., Christensen 2018). Queering, in this regard, is not limited to the task of rendering queer or LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lives visible to for example hospitality or event managers. This is but one aspect of queer matters, which are all about being at odds with dominant norms that render certain (groups of) people, their needs, dreams and wishes for the future invisible to management. How can we break with the idea, the norm of welcoming practices being universally hospitable to all? And how can we re-imagine, even envisioning tourism and hospitality through queer perspectives? These and other emerging questions are to be addressed during the workshop, whose intended outcome is a collectively co-created manifesto. Our aim is to get the manifesto published in a relevant journal as a call to action for research and practice avenues that can lead if not all then some of the way to a hopeful and queered hospitality future.

M3 - Conference abstract in proceedings

SN - 9780991687121

BT - Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings

A2 - Caton, Kellee

PB - Thompson Rivers University

CY - Kamloops

ER -

Friis Christensen J, Munar AM, Villeséche F, Eger C, Benali A. Queering Hospitality: Roses Are Red. Gender Is Performative. Why Is Tourism so Heteronormative? In Caton K, editor, Critical Tourism Studies Proceedings: CTS 2019. Kamloops: Thompson Rivers University. 2019. 3