Process Studies and Post-editing Training: Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom

Yanfang Jia, Xiangling Wang, Michael Carl

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study presents a series of translation process experiments carried out in a Master of Translation and Interpreting (MTI) course in China. The research was designed to facilitate the PE training purpose and to empirically test the impact of task types, text types, translation briefs, and post-editing (PE) guidelines on temporal, technical and cognitive efforts in the English-Chinese PE and human translation (HT) processes. The three efforts were gauged by production time per word, insertions, and deletions of keystrokes, and pause to word ratio (PWR) with a pause threshold of 1000ms, respectively. Thirty-one MTI students were assigned to translate/post-edit six texts according to specific translation briefs, which called for good enough quality for internal or publishable quality for external disseminations. Light and full TAUS PE guidelines were provided for corresponding PE tasks. Triangulated data from keystroke logging, screen recording, questionnaires, subjects’ guided interviews and written protocols were used for analysis. The preliminary results suggest that a) post-editing significantly reduces temporal, technical and cognitive efforts compared to translating manually; b) light post-editing takes more time than full post-editing; c) the students found PE different from human translation in many ways. They also reported various challenges in the post-editing process, mainly due to the influence of their previous translation training, lack of experience in PE and the ambiguous wording of the guidelines. The results also indicate that the direct use of process studies in the classroom can be effective both for producing quantitatively valid research findings and fulfilling pedagogical functions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2018
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventIATIS 6th International Conference: Translation & Cultural Mobility - Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Duration: 3 Jul 20186 Jul 2018
Conference number: 6
https://www.iatis.org/index.php/6th-conference-hong-kong-2018

Conference

ConferenceIATIS 6th International Conference
Number6
LocationHong Kong Baptist University
CountryHong Kong
CityHong Kong
Period03/07/201806/07/2018
Internet address

Keywords

  • Post-editing effort
  • Post-editing guidelines
  • Text type
  • Post-editing training
  • Translation process

Cite this

Jia, Y., Wang, X., & Carl, M. (2018). Process Studies and Post-editing Training: Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom. Abstract from IATIS 6th International Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
Jia, Yanfang ; Wang, Xiangling ; Carl, Michael. / Process Studies and Post-editing Training : Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom. Abstract from IATIS 6th International Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.1 p.
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Process Studies and Post-editing Training : Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom. / Jia, Yanfang; Wang, Xiangling; Carl, Michael.

2018. Abstract from IATIS 6th International Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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T2 - Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom

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AU - Wang, Xiangling

AU - Carl, Michael

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N2 - This study presents a series of translation process experiments carried out in a Master of Translation and Interpreting (MTI) course in China. The research was designed to facilitate the PE training purpose and to empirically test the impact of task types, text types, translation briefs, and post-editing (PE) guidelines on temporal, technical and cognitive efforts in the English-Chinese PE and human translation (HT) processes. The three efforts were gauged by production time per word, insertions, and deletions of keystrokes, and pause to word ratio (PWR) with a pause threshold of 1000ms, respectively. Thirty-one MTI students were assigned to translate/post-edit six texts according to specific translation briefs, which called for good enough quality for internal or publishable quality for external disseminations. Light and full TAUS PE guidelines were provided for corresponding PE tasks. Triangulated data from keystroke logging, screen recording, questionnaires, subjects’ guided interviews and written protocols were used for analysis. The preliminary results suggest that a) post-editing significantly reduces temporal, technical and cognitive efforts compared to translating manually; b) light post-editing takes more time than full post-editing; c) the students found PE different from human translation in many ways. They also reported various challenges in the post-editing process, mainly due to the influence of their previous translation training, lack of experience in PE and the ambiguous wording of the guidelines. The results also indicate that the direct use of process studies in the classroom can be effective both for producing quantitatively valid research findings and fulfilling pedagogical functions.

AB - This study presents a series of translation process experiments carried out in a Master of Translation and Interpreting (MTI) course in China. The research was designed to facilitate the PE training purpose and to empirically test the impact of task types, text types, translation briefs, and post-editing (PE) guidelines on temporal, technical and cognitive efforts in the English-Chinese PE and human translation (HT) processes. The three efforts were gauged by production time per word, insertions, and deletions of keystrokes, and pause to word ratio (PWR) with a pause threshold of 1000ms, respectively. Thirty-one MTI students were assigned to translate/post-edit six texts according to specific translation briefs, which called for good enough quality for internal or publishable quality for external disseminations. Light and full TAUS PE guidelines were provided for corresponding PE tasks. Triangulated data from keystroke logging, screen recording, questionnaires, subjects’ guided interviews and written protocols were used for analysis. The preliminary results suggest that a) post-editing significantly reduces temporal, technical and cognitive efforts compared to translating manually; b) light post-editing takes more time than full post-editing; c) the students found PE different from human translation in many ways. They also reported various challenges in the post-editing process, mainly due to the influence of their previous translation training, lack of experience in PE and the ambiguous wording of the guidelines. The results also indicate that the direct use of process studies in the classroom can be effective both for producing quantitatively valid research findings and fulfilling pedagogical functions.

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KW - Text type

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M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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Jia Y, Wang X, Carl M. Process Studies and Post-editing Training: Investigating English-Chinese Post-editing Process in the Classroom. 2018. Abstract from IATIS 6th International Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.