Mediating Identity: A Study of Media Influence on Organizational Identity Construction in a Celebrity Firm

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand their organization (sensemaking effect) and the gratification they derive from its positive representation (self-enhancement effect). Our findings suggest that positive media representations foster members' alignment around an emergent new understanding of what their organization is. Over time, however, celebrity may ‘captivate’ members' organizational identity beliefs and understandings, and impede further identity work as media persist in the replication of representations that differ from members' experienced reality, but are too appealing to them to be publicly contradicted.
    This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand their organization (sensemaking effect) and the gratification they derive from its positive representation (self-enhancement effect). Our findings suggest that positive media representations foster members' alignment around an emergent new understanding of what their organization is. Over time, however, celebrity may ‘captivate’ members' organizational identity beliefs and understandings, and impede further identity work as media persist in the replication of representations that differ from members' experienced reality, but are too appealing to them to be publicly contradicted.
    LanguageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Management Studies
    Volume48
    Issue number3
    Pages514-543
    ISSN0022-2380
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011

    Cite this

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    title = "Mediating Identity: A Study of Media Influence on Organizational Identity Construction in a Celebrity Firm",
    abstract = "This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand their organization (sensemaking effect) and the gratification they derive from its positive representation (self-enhancement effect). Our findings suggest that positive media representations foster members' alignment around an emergent new understanding of what their organization is. Over time, however, celebrity may ‘captivate’ members' organizational identity beliefs and understandings, and impede further identity work as media persist in the replication of representations that differ from members' experienced reality, but are too appealing to them to be publicly contradicted.",
    author = "Kj{\ae}rgaard, {Annemette Leonhardt} and Mette Morsing and Davide Ravasi",
    year = "2011",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00954.x",
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    Mediating Identity : A Study of Media Influence on Organizational Identity Construction in a Celebrity Firm. / Kjærgaard, Annemette Leonhardt; Morsing, Mette; Ravasi, Davide.

    In: Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2011, p. 514-543.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

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    T2 - Journal of Management Studies

    AU - Kjærgaard,Annemette Leonhardt

    AU - Morsing,Mette

    AU - Ravasi,Davide

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand their organization (sensemaking effect) and the gratification they derive from its positive representation (self-enhancement effect). Our findings suggest that positive media representations foster members' alignment around an emergent new understanding of what their organization is. Over time, however, celebrity may ‘captivate’ members' organizational identity beliefs and understandings, and impede further identity work as media persist in the replication of representations that differ from members' experienced reality, but are too appealing to them to be publicly contradicted.

    AB - This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand their organization (sensemaking effect) and the gratification they derive from its positive representation (self-enhancement effect). Our findings suggest that positive media representations foster members' alignment around an emergent new understanding of what their organization is. Over time, however, celebrity may ‘captivate’ members' organizational identity beliefs and understandings, and impede further identity work as media persist in the replication of representations that differ from members' experienced reality, but are too appealing to them to be publicly contradicted.

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00954.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00954.x

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