Introduction: The Politics of Change

Edward Ashbee, John Dumbrell

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The introduction sets a framework for subsequent chapters by considering theories of change and the extent to which there was consequential change during the Obama years. It draws upon earlier scholarship to suggest that although there certainly was no “transformation” (when new interests secure power, institutional relationships are rearranged, governmental priorities are recast on a long-run basis and when there is an accompanying paradigm shift), more limited, incremental forms of change were enacted through, for example, the Affordable Care Act or some of executive actions used to bypass Congress. Nonetheless, although recent literature within historical institutionalism has stressed the importance of incrementalism, it is vulnerable to rollback. Against this background, the introduction sets questions about the character of change that are addressed in the case studies included in this volume.
    The introduction sets a framework for subsequent chapters by considering theories of change and the extent to which there was consequential change during the Obama years. It draws upon earlier scholarship to suggest that although there certainly was no “transformation” (when new interests secure power, institutional relationships are rearranged, governmental priorities are recast on a long-run basis and when there is an accompanying paradigm shift), more limited, incremental forms of change were enacted through, for example, the Affordable Care Act or some of executive actions used to bypass Congress. Nonetheless, although recent literature within historical institutionalism has stressed the importance of incrementalism, it is vulnerable to rollback. Against this background, the introduction sets questions about the character of change that are addressed in the case studies included in this volume.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change
    EditorsEdward Ashbee, John Dumbrell
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Date2017
    Pages1-50
    ISBN (Print)9783319410326
    ISBN (Electronic)9783319410333
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2017
    SeriesRoutledge Studies in the History of the Americas

    Keywords

    • Change
    • Historical institutionalism
    • American political development
    • Incrementalism
    • Policy durability

    Cite this

    Ashbee, E., & Dumbrell, J. (2017). Introduction: The Politics of Change. In E. Ashbee, & J. Dumbrell (Eds.), The Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change (pp. 1-50). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Routledge Studies in the History of the Americas, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-41033-3
    Ashbee, Edward ; Dumbrell, John. / Introduction : The Politics of Change. The Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change. editor / Edward Ashbee ; John Dumbrell. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. pp. 1-50 (Routledge Studies in the History of the Americas).
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    Ashbee, E & Dumbrell, J 2017, Introduction: The Politics of Change. in E Ashbee & J Dumbrell (eds), The Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, Routledge Studies in the History of the Americas, pp. 1-50. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-41033-3

    Introduction : The Politics of Change. / Ashbee, Edward; Dumbrell, John.

    The Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change. ed. / Edward Ashbee; John Dumbrell. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. p. 1-50.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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    Ashbee E, Dumbrell J. Introduction: The Politics of Change. In Ashbee E, Dumbrell J, editors, The Obama Presidency and the Politics of Change. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 2017. p. 1-50. (Routledge Studies in the History of the Americas). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-41033-3