Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society

Karin Tweddell Levinsen, Janni Nielsen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The transition from the industrial to the knowledge or networked society has, together with the worldwide digitalization and e-permeation of our social, political and economic lives, brought challenges to the educational systems. The changes call for new key competences in terms of self-initiated and lifelong learning and digital literacy. At the same time, the implementation of new public management in educational institutions put pressure on students’ available time for studying and the qualitative outcome of learning processes. These conditions give birth to emerging tensions at the organizational level between effectiveness, quality and summative evaluation and at the individual level between personal cost-benefit-based choices of study approach and the demands for study activities related to problem-based project pedagogy within a (social) constructivist paradigm. What the authors meet in their practice are students who are (if at all) only familiar with the curriculum at a surface level and who expect the teachers to present digested versions of the curriculum. This chapter presents a design for teaching and learning approach in the shape of a design for learning model that aims to scaffold students’ self-initiated and reflective study practice that matches learning in the networked society and at the same time bypasses the consequences of the emerging tensions in the learning context. We believe that the model can be operationalized various specific educational activities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationExploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning
    EditorsLone Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Vivien Hodgson, David McConnell
    Number of pages20
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherSpringer Science+Business Media
    Publication date2012
    Pages237-256
    Chapter14
    ISBN (Print)9781461404958 , 1461404959
    ISBN (Electronic)9781461404965 , 1461404967
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event International Conference on Networked Learning. NLC 2010 - Aalborg, Denmark
    Duration: 2 May 20104 May 2010
    Conference number: 7
    http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/organisations/netlc/past/nlc2010/index.htm

    Conference

    Conference International Conference on Networked Learning. NLC 2010
    Number7
    CountryDenmark
    CityAalborg
    Period02/05/201004/05/2010
    Internet address

    Cite this

    Levinsen, K. T., & Nielsen, J. (2012). Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society. In L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson, & D. McConnell (Eds.), Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning (pp. 237-256). New York: Springer Science+Business Media. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0496-5_14
    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell ; Nielsen, Janni. / Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society. Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning. editor / Lone Dirckinck-Holmfeld ; Vivien Hodgson ; David McConnell. New York : Springer Science+Business Media, 2012. pp. 237-256
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    abstract = "The transition from the industrial to the knowledge or networked society has, together with the worldwide digitalization and e-permeation of our social, political and economic lives, brought challenges to the educational systems. The changes call for new key competences in terms of self-initiated and lifelong learning and digital literacy. At the same time, the implementation of new public management in educational institutions put pressure on students’ available time for studying and the qualitative outcome of learning processes. These conditions give birth to emerging tensions at the organizational level between effectiveness, quality and summative evaluation and at the individual level between personal cost-benefit-based choices of study approach and the demands for study activities related to problem-based project pedagogy within a (social) constructivist paradigm. What the authors meet in their practice are students who are (if at all) only familiar with the curriculum at a surface level and who expect the teachers to present digested versions of the curriculum. This chapter presents a design for teaching and learning approach in the shape of a design for learning model that aims to scaffold students’ self-initiated and reflective study practice that matches learning in the networked society and at the same time bypasses the consequences of the emerging tensions in the learning context. We believe that the model can be operationalized various specific educational activities.",
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    Levinsen, KT & Nielsen, J 2012, Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society. in L Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V Hodgson & D McConnell (eds), Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning. Springer Science+Business Media, New York, pp. 237-256, Aalborg, Denmark, 02/05/2010. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0496-5_14

    Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society. / Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Nielsen, Janni.

    Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning. ed. / Lone Dirckinck-Holmfeld; Vivien Hodgson; David McConnell. New York : Springer Science+Business Media, 2012. p. 237-256.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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    AB - The transition from the industrial to the knowledge or networked society has, together with the worldwide digitalization and e-permeation of our social, political and economic lives, brought challenges to the educational systems. The changes call for new key competences in terms of self-initiated and lifelong learning and digital literacy. At the same time, the implementation of new public management in educational institutions put pressure on students’ available time for studying and the qualitative outcome of learning processes. These conditions give birth to emerging tensions at the organizational level between effectiveness, quality and summative evaluation and at the individual level between personal cost-benefit-based choices of study approach and the demands for study activities related to problem-based project pedagogy within a (social) constructivist paradigm. What the authors meet in their practice are students who are (if at all) only familiar with the curriculum at a surface level and who expect the teachers to present digested versions of the curriculum. This chapter presents a design for teaching and learning approach in the shape of a design for learning model that aims to scaffold students’ self-initiated and reflective study practice that matches learning in the networked society and at the same time bypasses the consequences of the emerging tensions in the learning context. We believe that the model can be operationalized various specific educational activities.

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    Levinsen KT, Nielsen J. Innovating Design for Learning in the Networked Society. In Dirckinck-Holmfeld L, Hodgson V, McConnell D, editors, Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning. New York: Springer Science+Business Media. 2012. p. 237-256 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0496-5_14