Happy and in Charge: How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control

Nausheen Niaz, Catrine Jacobsen, Clara Zeller, Jeffrey Lins , Thomas Z. Ramsøy

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Key findings from decision neuroscience question the basis of the rational decision-maker and show that far from all aspects influencing decision-making are controllable in the sense of being shaped or guided though conscious deliberation. So where does this illusion of control come from and what influences it? In this paper, we investigate the correlation between affective states, risk taking and the illusion of control, trying to understand how emotions and mood affect risk taking behavior and decision-making through a stock trading study. We find that moods have a dynamic relationship to the experience and illusion of control
Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings
Volume10
Pages (from-to)47
ISSN1861-8243
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventThe 2014 NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference - Ludwig Maximilian University, München, Germany
Duration: 29 May 201430 May 2014
Conference number: 10
http://www.jnpe.org/front_content.php?idart=57

Conference

ConferenceThe 2014 NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference
Number10
LocationLudwig Maximilian University
CountryGermany
CityMünchen
Period29/05/201430/05/2014
Internet address

Cite this

Niaz, N., Jacobsen, C., Zeller, C., Lins , J., & Ramsøy, T. Z. (2014). Happy and in Charge: How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control. NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings, 10, 47.
Niaz, Nausheen ; Jacobsen, Catrine ; Zeller, Clara ; Lins , Jeffrey ; Ramsøy, Thomas Z. / Happy and in Charge : How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control. In: NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings. 2014 ; Vol. 10. pp. 47.
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Niaz, N, Jacobsen, C, Zeller, C, Lins , J & Ramsøy, TZ 2014, 'Happy and in Charge: How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control', NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings, vol. 10, pp. 47.

Happy and in Charge : How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control. / Niaz, Nausheen ; Jacobsen, Catrine; Zeller, Clara; Lins , Jeffrey; Ramsøy, Thomas Z.

In: NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 10, 2014, p. 47.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Happy and in Charge

T2 - How Moods Affect the Illusion of Control

AU - Niaz, Nausheen

AU - Jacobsen, Catrine

AU - Zeller, Clara

AU - Lins , Jeffrey

AU - Ramsøy, Thomas Z.

PY - 2014

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N2 - Key findings from decision neuroscience question the basis of the rational decision-maker and show that far from all aspects influencing decision-making are controllable in the sense of being shaped or guided though conscious deliberation. So where does this illusion of control come from and what influences it? In this paper, we investigate the correlation between affective states, risk taking and the illusion of control, trying to understand how emotions and mood affect risk taking behavior and decision-making through a stock trading study. We find that moods have a dynamic relationship to the experience and illusion of control

AB - Key findings from decision neuroscience question the basis of the rational decision-maker and show that far from all aspects influencing decision-making are controllable in the sense of being shaped or guided though conscious deliberation. So where does this illusion of control come from and what influences it? In this paper, we investigate the correlation between affective states, risk taking and the illusion of control, trying to understand how emotions and mood affect risk taking behavior and decision-making through a stock trading study. We find that moods have a dynamic relationship to the experience and illusion of control

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VL - 10

SP - 47

JO - NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings

JF - NeuroPsychoEconomics Conference Proceedings

SN - 1861-8243

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