From Shipbuilding to Alternative Maritime Industry: The Closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The past 20 years has seen several studies on the decline of European shipbuilding. The existing research mainly examines the reasons for the decline but not the consequences of the shipyard closures. This article examines what happened after the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999. The first part examines the various attempts that were made to save the shipyard during the 1990’s. The second part examines what activities were continued after the closure. It identifies six spin-offs and shows how the shipyard site was turned into a thriving business park with app. 1,000 jobs in 2011. The article furthermore shows how the activities gradually went from manufacturing in the late 1990’s to maritime service activities in 2011. Finally the article presents a statistical survey which examines what happened to the app. 1,300 workers that lost their jobs when the shipyard closed. The survey shows that the workers mainly went to neighbouring sectors and that their competences were widely sought for in the local business community. The article concludes that the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn wasn’t a breakdown but a transformation into new and more viable activities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalErhvervshistorisk Aarbog
Volume62
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)78-96
ISSN0071-1152
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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title = "From Shipbuilding to Alternative Maritime Industry: The Closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999",
abstract = "The past 20 years has seen several studies on the decline of European shipbuilding. The existing research mainly examines the reasons for the decline but not the consequences of the shipyard closures. This article examines what happened after the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999. The first part examines the various attempts that were made to save the shipyard during the 1990’s. The second part examines what activities were continued after the closure. It identifies six spin-offs and shows how the shipyard site was turned into a thriving business park with app. 1,000 jobs in 2011. The article furthermore shows how the activities gradually went from manufacturing in the late 1990’s to maritime service activities in 2011. Finally the article presents a statistical survey which examines what happened to the app. 1,300 workers that lost their jobs when the shipyard closed. The survey shows that the workers mainly went to neighbouring sectors and that their competences were widely sought for in the local business community. The article concludes that the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn wasn’t a breakdown but a transformation into new and more viable activities.",
author = "{Roslyng Olesen}, Thomas",
year = "2013",
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volume = "62",
pages = "78--96",
journal = "Erhvervshistorisk Aarbog",
issn = "0071-1152",
publisher = "Statens Arkiver Erhvervsarkivet",
number = "2",

}

From Shipbuilding to Alternative Maritime Industry : The Closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999. / Roslyng Olesen, Thomas.

In: Erhvervshistorisk Aarbog, Vol. 62, No. 2, 2013, p. 78-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - The Closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999

AU - Roslyng Olesen, Thomas

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AB - The past 20 years has seen several studies on the decline of European shipbuilding. The existing research mainly examines the reasons for the decline but not the consequences of the shipyard closures. This article examines what happened after the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn in 1999. The first part examines the various attempts that were made to save the shipyard during the 1990’s. The second part examines what activities were continued after the closure. It identifies six spin-offs and shows how the shipyard site was turned into a thriving business park with app. 1,000 jobs in 2011. The article furthermore shows how the activities gradually went from manufacturing in the late 1990’s to maritime service activities in 2011. Finally the article presents a statistical survey which examines what happened to the app. 1,300 workers that lost their jobs when the shipyard closed. The survey shows that the workers mainly went to neighbouring sectors and that their competences were widely sought for in the local business community. The article concludes that the closure of Danyard Frederikshavn wasn’t a breakdown but a transformation into new and more viable activities.

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