Exploring Preferences and Non-use Values for Hidden Archaeological Artefacts: A Case from Denmark

Thomas Lundhede, Trine Bille, Berit Hasler

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper presents a choice experiment study of a proposed wetland restoration project which aims to preserve archaeological artefacts from Stone Age villages which are presently buried within the topsoil. Wetland restoration can avoid destruction of the artefacts due to agricultural cultivation and drainage, and in addition improve biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results indicate that even though the artefacts are not visible or usable for the population of today, but may contain information and potential value for future generations, the strongest preferences displayed is for ensuring permanent protection of archaeological artefacts, rather than biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results are discussed in relation to the Prospect Theory: people value a loss of cultural heritage higher than a gain of new cultural goods or services. This insight is of general interest to cultural economics and cultural policy, especially with respect to heritage protection.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Journal of Cultural Policy
    Volume19
    Issue number4
    Pages (from-to)501-530
    ISSN1028-6632
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Cite this

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    title = "Exploring Preferences and Non-use Values for Hidden Archaeological Artefacts: A Case from Denmark",
    abstract = "This paper presents a choice experiment study of a proposed wetland restoration project which aims to preserve archaeological artefacts from Stone Age villages which are presently buried within the topsoil. Wetland restoration can avoid destruction of the artefacts due to agricultural cultivation and drainage, and in addition improve biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results indicate that even though the artefacts are not visible or usable for the population of today, but may contain information and potential value for future generations, the strongest preferences displayed is for ensuring permanent protection of archaeological artefacts, rather than biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results are discussed in relation to the Prospect Theory: people value a loss of cultural heritage higher than a gain of new cultural goods or services. This insight is of general interest to cultural economics and cultural policy, especially with respect to heritage protection.",
    keywords = "Heritage protection, Archaeological artefacts, Prospect Theory, Economic valuation, Cultural policy, Choice experiment",
    author = "Thomas Lundhede and Trine Bille and Berit Hasler",
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    Exploring Preferences and Non-use Values for Hidden Archaeological Artefacts : A Case from Denmark. / Lundhede, Thomas; Bille, Trine; Hasler, Berit.

    In: International Journal of Cultural Policy, Vol. 19, No. 4, 2013, p. 501-530.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Exploring Preferences and Non-use Values for Hidden Archaeological Artefacts

    T2 - A Case from Denmark

    AU - Lundhede, Thomas

    AU - Bille, Trine

    AU - Hasler, Berit

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - This paper presents a choice experiment study of a proposed wetland restoration project which aims to preserve archaeological artefacts from Stone Age villages which are presently buried within the topsoil. Wetland restoration can avoid destruction of the artefacts due to agricultural cultivation and drainage, and in addition improve biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results indicate that even though the artefacts are not visible or usable for the population of today, but may contain information and potential value for future generations, the strongest preferences displayed is for ensuring permanent protection of archaeological artefacts, rather than biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results are discussed in relation to the Prospect Theory: people value a loss of cultural heritage higher than a gain of new cultural goods or services. This insight is of general interest to cultural economics and cultural policy, especially with respect to heritage protection.

    AB - This paper presents a choice experiment study of a proposed wetland restoration project which aims to preserve archaeological artefacts from Stone Age villages which are presently buried within the topsoil. Wetland restoration can avoid destruction of the artefacts due to agricultural cultivation and drainage, and in addition improve biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results indicate that even though the artefacts are not visible or usable for the population of today, but may contain information and potential value for future generations, the strongest preferences displayed is for ensuring permanent protection of archaeological artefacts, rather than biological diversity and recreational opportunities. The results are discussed in relation to the Prospect Theory: people value a loss of cultural heritage higher than a gain of new cultural goods or services. This insight is of general interest to cultural economics and cultural policy, especially with respect to heritage protection.

    KW - Heritage protection

    KW - Archaeological artefacts

    KW - Prospect Theory

    KW - Economic valuation

    KW - Cultural policy

    KW - Choice experiment

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 19

    SP - 501

    EP - 530

    JO - International Journal of Cultural Policy

    JF - International Journal of Cultural Policy

    SN - 1028-6632

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