Enterprise Systems Education: How “Not Learning” Happens

Mari-Klara Stein, Robert D. Galliers

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Enterprise systems education poses a challenge in both industry and academic settings, and failure to successfully train end-users can result in significant monetary losses for companies. Adopting a participant observation methodology this study investigates the “not-learning” experiences of students in an academic context. Our findings suggest that “not-learning” is related to procedures (where to click?), processes (what is going to change, and where?) and integrative (how to make sense of the big picture?) aspects of enterprise systems. We contend that industry end-users face many similar learning blocks.
Simple knowledge typologies (e.g., system-specific, process-specific) that form the foundation for much enterprise systems training research may not capture some important nuances of learning. We propose a framework that separates content areas from types of knowledge-in-use, and helps in understanding learning failures in more detail.
Enterprise systems education poses a challenge in both industry and academic settings, and failure to successfully train end-users can result in significant monetary losses for companies. Adopting a participant observation methodology this study investigates the “not-learning” experiences of students in an academic context. Our findings suggest that “not-learning” is related to procedures (where to click?), processes (what is going to change, and where?) and integrative (how to make sense of the big picture?) aspects of enterprise systems. We contend that industry end-users face many similar learning blocks.
Simple knowledge typologies (e.g., system-specific, process-specific) that form the foundation for much enterprise systems training research may not capture some important nuances of learning. We propose a framework that separates content areas from types of knowledge-in-use, and helps in understanding learning failures in more detail.
LanguageEnglish
Date2013
Number of pages16
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

    Cite this

    @conference{2696941360b54b6dbdf74065d1d7f282,
    title = "Enterprise Systems Education: How “Not Learning” Happens",
    abstract = "Enterprise systems education poses a challenge in both industry and academic settings, and failure to successfully train end-users can result in significant monetary losses for companies. Adopting a participant observation methodology this study investigates the “not-learning” experiences of students in an academic context. Our findings suggest that “not-learning” is related to procedures (where to click?), processes (what is going to change, and where?) and integrative (how to make sense of the big picture?) aspects of enterprise systems. We contend that industry end-users face many similar learning blocks.Simple knowledge typologies (e.g., system-specific, process-specific) that form the foundation for much enterprise systems training research may not capture some important nuances of learning. We propose a framework that separates content areas from types of knowledge-in-use, and helps in understanding learning failures in more detail.",
    keywords = "Enterprise systems, Not-learning, Participant observation",
    author = "Mari-Klara Stein and Galliers, {Robert D.}",
    year = "2013",
    language = "English",

    }

    Enterprise Systems Education : How “Not Learning” Happens. / Stein, Mari-Klara; Galliers, Robert D. .

    2013.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

    TY - CONF

    T1 - Enterprise Systems Education

    T2 - How “Not Learning” Happens

    AU - Stein,Mari-Klara

    AU - Galliers,Robert D.

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Enterprise systems education poses a challenge in both industry and academic settings, and failure to successfully train end-users can result in significant monetary losses for companies. Adopting a participant observation methodology this study investigates the “not-learning” experiences of students in an academic context. Our findings suggest that “not-learning” is related to procedures (where to click?), processes (what is going to change, and where?) and integrative (how to make sense of the big picture?) aspects of enterprise systems. We contend that industry end-users face many similar learning blocks.Simple knowledge typologies (e.g., system-specific, process-specific) that form the foundation for much enterprise systems training research may not capture some important nuances of learning. We propose a framework that separates content areas from types of knowledge-in-use, and helps in understanding learning failures in more detail.

    AB - Enterprise systems education poses a challenge in both industry and academic settings, and failure to successfully train end-users can result in significant monetary losses for companies. Adopting a participant observation methodology this study investigates the “not-learning” experiences of students in an academic context. Our findings suggest that “not-learning” is related to procedures (where to click?), processes (what is going to change, and where?) and integrative (how to make sense of the big picture?) aspects of enterprise systems. We contend that industry end-users face many similar learning blocks.Simple knowledge typologies (e.g., system-specific, process-specific) that form the foundation for much enterprise systems training research may not capture some important nuances of learning. We propose a framework that separates content areas from types of knowledge-in-use, and helps in understanding learning failures in more detail.

    KW - Enterprise systems

    KW - Not-learning

    KW - Participant observation

    M3 - Paper

    ER -