Downfall Delayed: Danish Shipbuilding and Industrial Dislocation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This article analyses the decline of the Danish shipbuilding industry. European shipyards dominated global shipbuilding markets in the first half of the twentieth century, but began to be challenged by the Japanese from the 1950s and by the South Koreans from the late 1970s. More recently, China has taken over large slices of the global shipbuilding market and currently is the world's largest shipbuilding nation. As a result of this new competition, European shipyards closed en masse and Europe experienced a process of maritime deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s. Danish shipyards were not immune to these challenges, although maritime deindustrialisation in this country was almost two decades later than in many other European countries. This article examines how Denmark was able to escape this general maritime deindustrialisation for so long and offers three explanations: institutional, entrepreneurial and political
    This article analyses the decline of the Danish shipbuilding industry. European shipyards dominated global shipbuilding markets in the first half of the twentieth century, but began to be challenged by the Japanese from the 1950s and by the South Koreans from the late 1970s. More recently, China has taken over large slices of the global shipbuilding market and currently is the world's largest shipbuilding nation. As a result of this new competition, European shipyards closed en masse and Europe experienced a process of maritime deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s. Danish shipyards were not immune to these challenges, although maritime deindustrialisation in this country was almost two decades later than in many other European countries. This article examines how Denmark was able to escape this general maritime deindustrialisation for so long and offers three explanations: institutional, entrepreneurial and political
    LanguageEnglish
    JournalBusiness History
    Volume53
    Issue number4
    Pages557-582
    ISSN0007-6791
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011

    Keywords

      Cite this

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      title = "Downfall Delayed: Danish Shipbuilding and Industrial Dislocation",
      abstract = "This article analyses the decline of the Danish shipbuilding industry. European shipyards dominated global shipbuilding markets in the first half of the twentieth century, but began to be challenged by the Japanese from the 1950s and by the South Koreans from the late 1970s. More recently, China has taken over large slices of the global shipbuilding market and currently is the world's largest shipbuilding nation. As a result of this new competition, European shipyards closed en masse and Europe experienced a process of maritime deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s. Danish shipyards were not immune to these challenges, although maritime deindustrialisation in this country was almost two decades later than in many other European countries. This article examines how Denmark was able to escape this general maritime deindustrialisation for so long and offers three explanations: institutional, entrepreneurial and political",
      keywords = "globalisation, shipbuilding, industrial dislocation and decline",
      author = "{Taudal Poulsen}, Ren{\'e} and Henrik Sornn-Friese",
      year = "2011",
      doi = "10.1080/00076791.2011.574692",
      language = "English",
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      }

      Downfall Delayed : Danish Shipbuilding and Industrial Dislocation. / Taudal Poulsen, René; Sornn-Friese, Henrik.

      In: Business History, Vol. 53, No. 4, 2011, p. 557-582.

      Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

      TY - JOUR

      T1 - Downfall Delayed

      T2 - Business History

      AU - Taudal Poulsen,René

      AU - Sornn-Friese,Henrik

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      Y1 - 2011

      N2 - This article analyses the decline of the Danish shipbuilding industry. European shipyards dominated global shipbuilding markets in the first half of the twentieth century, but began to be challenged by the Japanese from the 1950s and by the South Koreans from the late 1970s. More recently, China has taken over large slices of the global shipbuilding market and currently is the world's largest shipbuilding nation. As a result of this new competition, European shipyards closed en masse and Europe experienced a process of maritime deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s. Danish shipyards were not immune to these challenges, although maritime deindustrialisation in this country was almost two decades later than in many other European countries. This article examines how Denmark was able to escape this general maritime deindustrialisation for so long and offers three explanations: institutional, entrepreneurial and political

      AB - This article analyses the decline of the Danish shipbuilding industry. European shipyards dominated global shipbuilding markets in the first half of the twentieth century, but began to be challenged by the Japanese from the 1950s and by the South Koreans from the late 1970s. More recently, China has taken over large slices of the global shipbuilding market and currently is the world's largest shipbuilding nation. As a result of this new competition, European shipyards closed en masse and Europe experienced a process of maritime deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s. Danish shipyards were not immune to these challenges, although maritime deindustrialisation in this country was almost two decades later than in many other European countries. This article examines how Denmark was able to escape this general maritime deindustrialisation for so long and offers three explanations: institutional, entrepreneurial and political

      KW - globalisation

      KW - shipbuilding

      KW - industrial dislocation and decline

      U2 - 10.1080/00076791.2011.574692

      DO - 10.1080/00076791.2011.574692

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      JF - Business History

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