Corporate Social Responsibility Communication

Stakeholder Information, Response and Involvement Strategies

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    While it is generally agreed that companies need to manage their relationships with their stakeholders, the way in which they choose to do so varies considerably. In this paper, it is argued that when companies want to communicate with stakeholders about their CSR initiatives, they need to involve those stakeholders in a two‐way communication process, defined as an ongoing iterative sense‐giving and sense‐making process. The paper also argues that companies need to communicate through carefully crafted and increasingly sophisticated processes. Three CSR communication strategies are developed. Based on empirical illustrations and prior research, the authors argue that managers need to move from ‘informing’ and ‘responding’ to ‘involving’ stakeholders in CSR communication itself. They conclude that managers need to expand the role of stakeholders in corporate CSR communication processes if they want to improve their efforts to build legitimacy, a positive reputation and lasting stakeholder relationships.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalBusiness Ethics - A European Review
    Volume15
    Issue number4
    Pages (from-to)323-338
    Number of pages16
    ISSN0962-8770
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

    Cite this

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    title = "Corporate Social Responsibility Communication: Stakeholder Information, Response and Involvement Strategies",
    abstract = "While it is generally agreed that companies need to manage their relationships with their stakeholders, the way in which they choose to do so varies considerably. In this paper, it is argued that when companies want to communicate with stakeholders about their CSR initiatives, they need to involve those stakeholders in a two‐way communication process, defined as an ongoing iterative sense‐giving and sense‐making process. The paper also argues that companies need to communicate through carefully crafted and increasingly sophisticated processes. Three CSR communication strategies are developed. Based on empirical illustrations and prior research, the authors argue that managers need to move from ‘informing’ and ‘responding’ to ‘involving’ stakeholders in CSR communication itself. They conclude that managers need to expand the role of stakeholders in corporate CSR communication processes if they want to improve their efforts to build legitimacy, a positive reputation and lasting stakeholder relationships.",
    keywords = "Virksomhedens sociale ansvar, Etisk ledelse, CSR",
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    Corporate Social Responsibility Communication : Stakeholder Information, Response and Involvement Strategies. / Morsing, Mette; Schultz, Majken.

    In: Business Ethics - A European Review, Vol. 15, No. 4, 10.2006, p. 323-338.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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