Challenging or Enhancing the EU's Legitimacy? The Evolution of Representative Bureaucracy in the Commision's Staff Policies

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This article presents an analysis of the European Commission’s staffing policies. It focuses in particular on the extent to which, over time, the Commission has taken the criterion of nationality into account. The theoretical framework of this study is the theory of representative bureaucracy. The article shows that, although the Commission does not use a quota system, its staffing policies have evolved from a limited practice of representation to a complex, explicit, but flexible strategy of representation, which satisfies the criteria of representative bureaucracy. However, due to the duty of loyalty to which civil servants of the European Union submit, these policies only satisfy the criterion of passive representation. The article ends on an explorative note, with the hypothesis that a third type of representation exists. It suggests the creation of a third concept, linkage representation, to account for this
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
    Volume23
    Issue number4
    Pages (from-to)817-838
    Number of pages22
    ISSN1053-1858
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

    Cite this

    @article{89163d797d9c44d99ea896acacffc32b,
    title = "Challenging or Enhancing the EU's Legitimacy?: The Evolution of Representative Bureaucracy in the Commision's Staff Policies",
    abstract = "This article presents an analysis of the European Commission’s staffing policies. It focuses in particular on the extent to which, over time, the Commission has taken the criterion of nationality into account. The theoretical framework of this study is the theory of representative bureaucracy. The article shows that, although the Commission does not use a quota system, its staffing policies have evolved from a limited practice of representation to a complex, explicit, but flexible strategy of representation, which satisfies the criteria of representative bureaucracy. However, due to the duty of loyalty to which civil servants of the European Union submit, these policies only satisfy the criterion of passive representation. The article ends on an explorative note, with the hypothesis that a third type of representation exists. It suggests the creation of a third concept, linkage representation, to account for this",
    keywords = "European Union, Public Administration, Monetary Unions, Organizational Inertia, Evaluation, Study and Teaching, Rational-legal Authority",
    author = "Magali Gravier",
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    language = "English",
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    Challenging or Enhancing the EU's Legitimacy? The Evolution of Representative Bureaucracy in the Commision's Staff Policies. / Gravier, Magali.

    In: Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Vol. 23, No. 4, 10.2013, p. 817-838.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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