Associations Between Social Vulnerabilities and Dietary Patterns in European Children: The Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study

Isabel Iguacel, Juan M. Fernandez-Alvira, Karin Bammann, Bart De Clercq, Gabriele Eiben, Wencke Gwozdz, Dénes Molnar, Valeria Pala, Stalo Papoutsou, Paola Russo, Toomas Veidebaum, Maike Wolters, Claudia Börnhorst, Luis A. Moreno

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    Abstract

    Socio-economic inequalities in childhood can determine dietary patterns, and therefore future health. This study aimed to explore associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns assessed at two time points, and to investigate the association between accumulation of vulnerabilities and dietary patterns. A total of 9301 children aged 2–9 years participated at baseline and 2-year follow-up examinations of the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS study. In all, three dietary patterns were identified at baseline and follow-up by applying the K-means clustering algorithm based on a higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food (processed), sweet foods and drinks (sweet), and fruits and vegetables (healthy). Vulnerable groups were defined at baseline as follows: children whose parents lacked a social network, children from single-parent families, children of migrant origin and children with unemployed parents. Multinomial mixed models were used to assess the associations between social vulnerabilities and children’s dietary patterns at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents lacked a social network (OR 1·31; 99 % CI 1·01, 1·70) and migrants (OR 1·45; 99 % CI 1·15, 1·83) were more likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents were homemakers (OR 0·74; 99 % CI 0·60, 0·92) were less likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline. A higher number of vulnerabilities was associated with a higher probability of children being in the processed cluster (OR 1·78; 99 % CI 1·21, 2·62). Therefore, special attention should be paid to children of vulnerable groups as they present unhealthier dietary patterns.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalThe British Journal of Nutrition
    Volume116
    Issue number7
    Pages (from-to)1288-1297
    Number of pages10
    ISSN0007-1145
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

    Keywords

    • Vulnerable groups
    • Dietary patterns
    • Inequalities
    • Socio-economic status
    • Children

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