Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments?

Cao Fang, Weiquan Wang, Chee-Wee Tan, Eric T. K. Lim, XinMei Lui

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Firms organize tournaments in crowdsourcing platforms to outsource complex tasks to external contributors. Members of a crowdsourcing platform may form temporarily self-organized virtual teams to participate in a crowdsourcing tournament. Social dominance-based faultlines widely exist in these virtual teams. These faultlines result from the alignment of team member’s social dominance related attributes (e.g., rank and tier) in the crowdsourcing platform and may spilt group into subgroups. Although inter-subgroup bias may disrupt team communication and collaboration, distinct knowledge and perspective from different subgroups are potential resource to group brainstorming and team coordination. Drawing on the Categorization- Elaboration Model (CEM), this study investigates the contingent effects of team intellectual capital and team feedback seeking tendency on the relationship between social dominance-based faultlines and team performance in the context of crowdsourcing tournament. We collected real objective data about 208 teams from one of the biggest crowdsourcing platforms, Kaggle.com. We find that social dominance- based faultlines positively affect team performance for teams with low intellectual capital and high feedback seeking tendency; by contrast, these faultlines negatively affect team performance for teams with high intellectual capital and low feedback seeking tendency. Academic and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management
EditorsGuclu Atinc
Number of pages6
Place of PublicationBriar Cliff Manor, NY
PublisherAcademy of Management
Publication date2018
Article number184
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventThe Academy of Management Annual Meeting 2018: Improving Lives - Chicago, United States
Duration: 10 Aug 201814 Aug 2018
Conference number: 78
http://aom.org/annualmeeting/

Conference

ConferenceThe Academy of Management Annual Meeting 2018
Number78
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period10/08/201814/08/2018
Internet address
SeriesAcademy of Management Proceedings
ISSN2151-6561

Cite this

Fang, C., Wang, W., Tan, C-W., Lim, E. T. K., & Lui, X. (2018). Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments? In G. Atinc (Ed.), Proceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management [184] Briar Cliff Manor, NY: Academy of Management. Academy of Management Proceedings https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.184
Fang, Cao ; Wang, Weiquan ; Tan, Chee-Wee ; Lim, Eric T. K. ; Lui, XinMei. / Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments?. Proceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. editor / Guclu Atinc. Briar Cliff Manor, NY : Academy of Management, 2018. (Academy of Management Proceedings).
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abstract = "Firms organize tournaments in crowdsourcing platforms to outsource complex tasks to external contributors. Members of a crowdsourcing platform may form temporarily self-organized virtual teams to participate in a crowdsourcing tournament. Social dominance-based faultlines widely exist in these virtual teams. These faultlines result from the alignment of team member’s social dominance related attributes (e.g., rank and tier) in the crowdsourcing platform and may spilt group into subgroups. Although inter-subgroup bias may disrupt team communication and collaboration, distinct knowledge and perspective from different subgroups are potential resource to group brainstorming and team coordination. Drawing on the Categorization- Elaboration Model (CEM), this study investigates the contingent effects of team intellectual capital and team feedback seeking tendency on the relationship between social dominance-based faultlines and team performance in the context of crowdsourcing tournament. We collected real objective data about 208 teams from one of the biggest crowdsourcing platforms, Kaggle.com. We find that social dominance- based faultlines positively affect team performance for teams with low intellectual capital and high feedback seeking tendency; by contrast, these faultlines negatively affect team performance for teams with high intellectual capital and low feedback seeking tendency. Academic and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.",
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Fang, C, Wang, W, Tan, C-W, Lim, ETK & Lui, X 2018, Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments? in G Atinc (ed.), Proceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management., 184, Academy of Management, Briar Cliff Manor, NY, Academy of Management Proceedings, Chicago, United States, 10/08/2018. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.184

Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments? / Fang, Cao; Wang, Weiquan; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.; Lui, XinMei.

Proceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. ed. / Guclu Atinc. Briar Cliff Manor, NY : Academy of Management, 2018. 184 (Academy of Management Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Fang C, Wang W, Tan C-W, Lim ETK, Lui X. Are Social Dominance-based Faultlines Harmful in Crowdsourcing Tournaments? In Atinc G, editor, Proceedings of the Seventy-eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. Briar Cliff Manor, NY: Academy of Management. 2018. 184. (Academy of Management Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.184