An Integrative Theoretical Model for Improving Resident–city Identification

Sebastian Zenker, Sibylle Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Research from social and environmental psychology has shown that identification by residents with a place leads to numerous desirable outcomes like increased commitment and residential satisfaction. Thus, in the competition for residents, cities focus on building a favorable identity of a place to increase identification with the place. However, little is known regarding the predictors of resident–city identification and their link to desirable outcomes. We thus present an interdisciplinary model which outlines determinants and outcomes of identification and which integrates theories from geography, psychology, and organizational science to introduce a new theoretical perspective to the field of urban research. We propose that a strong resident–city identification results from a fit between the city prototype and the resident’s self-concept. In this relationship, perceived place complexity is a central variable. We develop research propositions and suggest an agenda for testing the model empirically. Finally, we discuss how increasing resident–city identification by using a more complex communication can benefit both the city and its inhabitants.
Research from social and environmental psychology has shown that identification by residents with a place leads to numerous desirable outcomes like increased commitment and residential satisfaction. Thus, in the competition for residents, cities focus on building a favorable identity of a place to increase identification with the place. However, little is known regarding the predictors of resident–city identification and their link to desirable outcomes. We thus present an interdisciplinary model which outlines determinants and outcomes of identification and which integrates theories from geography, psychology, and organizational science to introduce a new theoretical perspective to the field of urban research. We propose that a strong resident–city identification results from a fit between the city prototype and the resident’s self-concept. In this relationship, perceived place complexity is a central variable. We develop research propositions and suggest an agenda for testing the model empirically. Finally, we discuss how increasing resident–city identification by using a more complex communication can benefit both the city and its inhabitants.
LanguageEnglish
JournalEnvironment and Planning A
Volume46
Issue number3
Pages715-729
ISSN0308-518X
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

    Cite this

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    title = "An Integrative Theoretical Model for Improving Resident–city Identification",
    abstract = "Research from social and environmental psychology has shown that identification by residents with a place leads to numerous desirable outcomes like increased commitment and residential satisfaction. Thus, in the competition for residents, cities focus on building a favorable identity of a place to increase identification with the place. However, little is known regarding the predictors of resident–city identification and their link to desirable outcomes. We thus present an interdisciplinary model which outlines determinants and outcomes of identification and which integrates theories from geography, psychology, and organizational science to introduce a new theoretical perspective to the field of urban research. We propose that a strong resident–city identification results from a fit between the city prototype and the resident’s self-concept. In this relationship, perceived place complexity is a central variable. We develop research propositions and suggest an agenda for testing the model empirically. Finally, we discuss how increasing resident–city identification by using a more complex communication can benefit both the city and its inhabitants.",
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    author = "Sebastian Zenker and Sibylle Petersen",
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    An Integrative Theoretical Model for Improving Resident–city Identification. / Zenker, Sebastian; Petersen, Sibylle.

    In: Environment and Planning A, Vol. 46, No. 3, 2014, p. 715-729.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - An Integrative Theoretical Model for Improving Resident–city Identification

    AU - Zenker,Sebastian

    AU - Petersen,Sibylle

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Research from social and environmental psychology has shown that identification by residents with a place leads to numerous desirable outcomes like increased commitment and residential satisfaction. Thus, in the competition for residents, cities focus on building a favorable identity of a place to increase identification with the place. However, little is known regarding the predictors of resident–city identification and their link to desirable outcomes. We thus present an interdisciplinary model which outlines determinants and outcomes of identification and which integrates theories from geography, psychology, and organizational science to introduce a new theoretical perspective to the field of urban research. We propose that a strong resident–city identification results from a fit between the city prototype and the resident’s self-concept. In this relationship, perceived place complexity is a central variable. We develop research propositions and suggest an agenda for testing the model empirically. Finally, we discuss how increasing resident–city identification by using a more complex communication can benefit both the city and its inhabitants.

    AB - Research from social and environmental psychology has shown that identification by residents with a place leads to numerous desirable outcomes like increased commitment and residential satisfaction. Thus, in the competition for residents, cities focus on building a favorable identity of a place to increase identification with the place. However, little is known regarding the predictors of resident–city identification and their link to desirable outcomes. We thus present an interdisciplinary model which outlines determinants and outcomes of identification and which integrates theories from geography, psychology, and organizational science to introduce a new theoretical perspective to the field of urban research. We propose that a strong resident–city identification results from a fit between the city prototype and the resident’s self-concept. In this relationship, perceived place complexity is a central variable. We develop research propositions and suggest an agenda for testing the model empirically. Finally, we discuss how increasing resident–city identification by using a more complex communication can benefit both the city and its inhabitants.

    KW - City identification

    KW - Complexity

    KW - City communication

    KW - City marketing

    KW - Social identity

    KW - Place perception

    KW - Recidents

    U2 - 10.1068/a46191

    DO - 10.1068/a46191

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 46

    SP - 715

    EP - 729

    JO - Environment and Planning A

    T2 - Environment and Planning A

    JF - Environment and Planning A

    SN - 0308-518X

    IS - 3

    ER -