AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour

Yong Suk Lee, Benjamin Cedric Larsen, Michael Webb, Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar

Research output: Other contributionNet publication - Internet publicationCommunication

Abstract

As artificial intelligence becomes more widespread and its performance improves, it will likely have significant long-term consequences for jobs, inequality, organisations, and competition. Regulation may be used to address its risks and possibilities, but little is known about how AI-related regulation might affect firm behaviour. This column examines the impact of actual and potential AI regulations on business managers through a randomised online survey experiment. It finds that exposure to information about regulation decreases managers’ reported intent to adopt AI technologies in their firm’s business processes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date14 Dec 2019
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherCentre for Economic Policy Research
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • AI
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Regulation
  • US
  • Firms
  • Technology
  • Firm behaviour
  • Firm performance

Cite this

Lee, Y. S., Larsen, B. C., Webb, M., & Cuéllar, M-F. (2019, Dec 14). AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour. London: Centre for Economic Policy Research.
Lee, Yong Suk ; Larsen, Benjamin Cedric ; Webb, Michael ; Cuéllar, Mariano-Florentino. / AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour. 2019. London : Centre for Economic Policy Research.
@misc{36e7faf37e0f47a4b627cacc00e1152f,
title = "AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour",
abstract = "As artificial intelligence becomes more widespread and its performance improves, it will likely have significant long-term consequences for jobs, inequality, organisations, and competition. Regulation may be used to address its risks and possibilities, but little is known about how AI-related regulation might affect firm behaviour. This column examines the impact of actual and potential AI regulations on business managers through a randomised online survey experiment. It finds that exposure to information about regulation decreases managers’ reported intent to adopt AI technologies in their firm’s business processes.",
keywords = "AI, Artificial intelligence, Regulation, US, Firms, Technology, Firm behaviour, Firm performance, AI, Artificial intelligence, Regulation, US, Firms, Technology, Firm behaviour, Firm performance",
author = "Lee, {Yong Suk} and Larsen, {Benjamin Cedric} and Michael Webb and Mariano-Florentino Cu{\'e}llar",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "14",
language = "English",
publisher = "Centre for Economic Policy Research",
address = "United Kingdom",
type = "Other",

}

Lee, YS, Larsen, BC, Webb, M & Cuéllar, M-F 2019, AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour. Centre for Economic Policy Research, London.

AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour. / Lee, Yong Suk; Larsen, Benjamin Cedric ; Webb, Michael; Cuéllar, Mariano-Florentino.

London : Centre for Economic Policy Research. 2019, Column.

Research output: Other contributionNet publication - Internet publicationCommunication

TY - ICOMM

T1 - AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour

AU - Lee, Yong Suk

AU - Larsen, Benjamin Cedric

AU - Webb, Michael

AU - Cuéllar, Mariano-Florentino

PY - 2019/12/14

Y1 - 2019/12/14

N2 - As artificial intelligence becomes more widespread and its performance improves, it will likely have significant long-term consequences for jobs, inequality, organisations, and competition. Regulation may be used to address its risks and possibilities, but little is known about how AI-related regulation might affect firm behaviour. This column examines the impact of actual and potential AI regulations on business managers through a randomised online survey experiment. It finds that exposure to information about regulation decreases managers’ reported intent to adopt AI technologies in their firm’s business processes.

AB - As artificial intelligence becomes more widespread and its performance improves, it will likely have significant long-term consequences for jobs, inequality, organisations, and competition. Regulation may be used to address its risks and possibilities, but little is known about how AI-related regulation might affect firm behaviour. This column examines the impact of actual and potential AI regulations on business managers through a randomised online survey experiment. It finds that exposure to information about regulation decreases managers’ reported intent to adopt AI technologies in their firm’s business processes.

KW - AI

KW - Artificial intelligence

KW - Regulation

KW - US

KW - Firms

KW - Technology

KW - Firm behaviour

KW - Firm performance

KW - AI

KW - Artificial intelligence

KW - Regulation

KW - US

KW - Firms

KW - Technology

KW - Firm behaviour

KW - Firm performance

M3 - Net publication - Internet publication

PB - Centre for Economic Policy Research

CY - London

ER -

Lee YS, Larsen BC, Webb M, Cuéllar M-F. AI Regulation and Firm Behaviour. 2019.