Accessing Remote Knowledge

The Roles of Trade Fairs, Pipelines, Crowdsourcing and Listening Posts

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Work on clusters during the last few decades convincingly demonstrates enhanced opportunities for local growth and entrepreneurship, but external upstream knowledge linkages are often overlooked or taken for granted. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by investigating why and how young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote sources.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Economic Geography
    Volume14
    Issue number5
    Pages (from-to)883-902
    ISSN1468-2702
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Cite this

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    title = "Accessing Remote Knowledge: The Roles of Trade Fairs, Pipelines, Crowdsourcing and Listening Posts",
    abstract = "Work on clusters during the last few decades convincingly demonstrates enhanced opportunities for local growth and entrepreneurship, but external upstream knowledge linkages are often overlooked or taken for granted. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by investigating why and how young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote sources.",
    keywords = "Remote knowledge, Global knowledge transfer, Young single-site firms",
    author = "Peter Maskell",
    year = "2014",
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    language = "English",
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    journal = "Journal of Economic Geography",
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    }

    Accessing Remote Knowledge : The Roles of Trade Fairs, Pipelines, Crowdsourcing and Listening Posts. / Maskell, Peter.

    In: Journal of Economic Geography, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2014, p. 883-902.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Maskell, Peter

    PY - 2014

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    N2 - Work on clusters during the last few decades convincingly demonstrates enhanced opportunities for local growth and entrepreneurship, but external upstream knowledge linkages are often overlooked or taken for granted. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by investigating why and how young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote sources.

    AB - Work on clusters during the last few decades convincingly demonstrates enhanced opportunities for local growth and entrepreneurship, but external upstream knowledge linkages are often overlooked or taken for granted. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by investigating why and how young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote sources.

    KW - Remote knowledge

    KW - Global knowledge transfer

    KW - Young single-site firms

    U2 - 10.1093/jeg/lbu002

    DO - 10.1093/jeg/lbu002

    M3 - Journal article

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