Who Takes the Child to the Doctor?

Mom, Pretty Much All of the Time

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Resumé

We document the degree to which Danish mothers are responsible for handling their children’s medical services. Using unique administration data on detailed medical services that were performed on all Danish children from 1992 to 1995, we find that, on average, more than 90% of all children’s medical services were handled by their mothers rather than their fathers. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use medical register data to quantify domestic time use. As these services are mainly performed during work hours, this finding provides one mechanism by which absenteeism increases as a consequence of motherhood. Furthermore, the economic variables that should affect a household’s assignment of a task like taking the child to the doctor are shown to explain very little, suggesting that other factors, such as societal norms, are at play.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftApplied Economics Letters
Vol/bind24
Udgave nummer17
Sider (fra-til)1267-1276
ISSN1350-4851
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Emneord

  • Child medical care
  • Child care
  • Household time allocation
  • Family gap

Citer dette

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Who Takes the Child to the Doctor? Mom, Pretty Much All of the Time. / Daly, Moira; Groes, Fane.

I: Applied Economics Letters, Bind 24, Nr. 17, 2017, s. 1267-1276.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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