The ‘Then’ and the ‘Now’ of Forced Relocation of Indigenous Peoples: Repercussions in International Law, Torts and Beyond

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Abstract

Forced relocations of tribal and indigenous peoples may seem a thing of the past, as few still defend colonialism. It is therefore seen as a historical trait that has reached its conclusion. Nevertheless, forced relocations of peoples still happens to this day, and may happen again; in the Arctic, for instance, several superpowers of this world express much interest in a strategic presence in this specific area. Today, a number of European countries have indigenous peoples on their territories. This article discusses this topic, taking its starting point in a case on forced relocation, which lasted for six decades. This article also discusses how forced relocation is regulated and possibly could be better handled today.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Public Law
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)203-220
Antal sider18
ISSN1354-3725
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2022

Emneord

  • Indigenous People
  • Tort law
  • Human rights
  • Forced relocation
  • Expropriation
  • The Thule Tribe
  • Greenland
  • Public Liability
  • Leniency
  • Compensation Schemes

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