The Settlement Utopia: Brotherly Love, Discipline, and Social Critique

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Resumé

The Settlement movement, which originated in late nineteenth-century England, was a pioneer in bettering the conditions of the working poor. It pursued the utopian project of locating ‘settlements’ within poverty-ridden neighbourhoods where respectable students should meet slum dwellers on equal terms. This article explores the trajectory of the comparatively under-researched Danish offspring of the movement. It demonstrates the tempering and compromise that occurred when utopian ideals of ‘brotherly love’, ‘God’s Kingdom’, and ‘radical social change’ were realized in concrete social arrangements. Contradictions and ambiguities arose when utopian ideas were confronted with what could be done. The Settlement became a highly ambiguous space, a ‘heterotopia’. The roots of the contradictions cannot simply be identified in the external pressure of legal requirements and funding criteria represented by public welfare agencies. The contradictions can also be excavated from the Settlement’s own ideological doctrines and its historical development.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Civil Society
Vol/bind12
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)141-157
ISSN1744-8689
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Emneord

  • The settlement
  • Christian philanthropy
  • Utopia
  • Heterotopia
  • Social welfare

Citer dette

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The Settlement Utopia : Brotherly Love, Discipline, and Social Critique. / Villadsen, Kaspar.

I: Journal of Civil Society, Bind 12, Nr. 2, 2016, s. 141-157.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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