The Not-so-sharing Economy

Publikation: AndetUdgivelser på nettet - Net-publikationRådgivning

Resumé

With the rise of Airbnb and Uber into the elite club of Silicon Valley superstar firms, the sharing economy has become an accepted business concept and social practice. Apart from the fact that sharing economy platforms (SEPs), such as Airbnb and Uber, are very savvy in playing labelling games (most of them have little to nothing to do with actual sharing), they are also very savvy in purposefully blurring established institutional boundaries and categories – most prominently, categories of employment and labour. By facilitating the “casual participation” of private individuals as users of their services, SEPs can gain significant advantages over well-established incumbents as they disrupt mature markets and labour structures as well as challenge long-held wisdoms of how to organize the creation and distribution of value.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato9 jul. 2018
Udgivelses stedFrederiksberg
UdgiverThe Business of Society
StatusUdgivet - 9 jul. 2018

Emneord

  • Concepts
  • Economic
  • Ethics
  • Featured
  • Issues
  • Models
  • News
  • Regulation
  • Social
  • Technology

Citer dette

Marton, A. (2018, jul 9). The Not-so-sharing Economy. Frederiksberg: The Business of Society.
Marton, Attila. / The Not-so-sharing Economy. 2018. Frederiksberg : The Business of Society.
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Marton, A 2018, The Not-so-sharing Economy. The Business of Society, Frederiksberg.

The Not-so-sharing Economy. / Marton, Attila.

Frederiksberg : The Business of Society. 2018, Artikel.

Publikation: AndetUdgivelser på nettet - Net-publikationRådgivning

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