(Re-)enter the State

Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

This chapter takes its point of departure in United Nations (UN) and OECD business governance instruments as examples of emerging transnational governance to address public interests and social expectations and needs through norms for transnational economic activity and institutions to promote and enforce such norms. This is discussed from the interaction between the UN Framework (2008) and Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (2011) and the 2011 revision of OECD’s Guidelines for Multinational (and other) enterprises. These are evidence of active governmental involvement in shaping CSR through transnational normative standards and social risk-based due diligence recommendations, and the reactive and proactive enforcement and promotional role of National Contact Points under OECD’s Guidelines. We discuss this from the perspective of public authorities’ rationality leading them to address public interests through CSR. We show that a public interest and transnational law take on authorities’ soft or hard efforts to shape business activity through CSR offers a perspective that differs from the previous literature on the public–private connection between CSR and public interests. It adds to the literature by focusing first and foremost on CSR as a way to implement public policy interest through business activity rather than the strategic interest of business, and because it shows that CSR is shifting from implicit or even explicit business focus on assisting in governmental tasks to explicit public regulatory focus aiming at reducing business-related infringement of public interests.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelCorporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change : Institutional and Organizational Perspectives
RedaktørerArnaud Sales
Antal sider15
Udgivelses stedCham
ForlagSpringer
Publikationsdato2019
Sider119-133
Kapitel6
ISBN (Trykt)9783030154059
ISBN (Elektronisk)9783030154073
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019
NavnEthical Economy
Vol/bind57
ISSN2211-2707

Bibliografisk note

CBS Bibliotek har ikke adgang til materialet

Emneord

  • Business and human rights
  • CSR and public policy objectives
  • Governmental regulation of CSR
  • OECD’s guidelines for multinational enterprises and national contact points
  • ‘Smart’ regulation
  • Transnational business governance

Citer dette

Buhmann, K. (2019). (Re-)enter the State: Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions. I A. Sales (red.), Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change: Institutional and Organizational Perspectives (s. 119-133). Cham: Springer. Ethical Economy, Bind. 57 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15407-3_6
Buhmann, Karin . / (Re-)enter the State : Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions. Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change: Institutional and Organizational Perspectives. red. / Arnaud Sales. Cham : Springer, 2019. s. 119-133 (Ethical Economy, Bind 57).
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abstract = "This chapter takes its point of departure in United Nations (UN) and OECD business governance instruments as examples of emerging transnational governance to address public interests and social expectations and needs through norms for transnational economic activity and institutions to promote and enforce such norms. This is discussed from the interaction between the UN Framework (2008) and Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (2011) and the 2011 revision of OECD’s Guidelines for Multinational (and other) enterprises. These are evidence of active governmental involvement in shaping CSR through transnational normative standards and social risk-based due diligence recommendations, and the reactive and proactive enforcement and promotional role of National Contact Points under OECD’s Guidelines. We discuss this from the perspective of public authorities’ rationality leading them to address public interests through CSR. We show that a public interest and transnational law take on authorities’ soft or hard efforts to shape business activity through CSR offers a perspective that differs from the previous literature on the public–private connection between CSR and public interests. It adds to the literature by focusing first and foremost on CSR as a way to implement public policy interest through business activity rather than the strategic interest of business, and because it shows that CSR is shifting from implicit or even explicit business focus on assisting in governmental tasks to explicit public regulatory focus aiming at reducing business-related infringement of public interests.",
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Buhmann, K 2019, (Re-)enter the State: Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions. i A Sales (red.), Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change: Institutional and Organizational Perspectives. Springer, Cham, Ethical Economy, bind 57, s. 119-133. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15407-3_6

(Re-)enter the State : Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions. / Buhmann, Karin .

Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change: Institutional and Organizational Perspectives. red. / Arnaud Sales. Cham : Springer, 2019. s. 119-133 (Ethical Economy, Bind 57).

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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AB - This chapter takes its point of departure in United Nations (UN) and OECD business governance instruments as examples of emerging transnational governance to address public interests and social expectations and needs through norms for transnational economic activity and institutions to promote and enforce such norms. This is discussed from the interaction between the UN Framework (2008) and Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (2011) and the 2011 revision of OECD’s Guidelines for Multinational (and other) enterprises. These are evidence of active governmental involvement in shaping CSR through transnational normative standards and social risk-based due diligence recommendations, and the reactive and proactive enforcement and promotional role of National Contact Points under OECD’s Guidelines. We discuss this from the perspective of public authorities’ rationality leading them to address public interests through CSR. We show that a public interest and transnational law take on authorities’ soft or hard efforts to shape business activity through CSR offers a perspective that differs from the previous literature on the public–private connection between CSR and public interests. It adds to the literature by focusing first and foremost on CSR as a way to implement public policy interest through business activity rather than the strategic interest of business, and because it shows that CSR is shifting from implicit or even explicit business focus on assisting in governmental tasks to explicit public regulatory focus aiming at reducing business-related infringement of public interests.

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Buhmann K. (Re-)enter the State: Business and Human Rights Dynamics as Shapers of CSR Norms and Institutions. I Sales A, red., Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Change: Institutional and Organizational Perspectives. Cham: Springer. 2019. s. 119-133. (Ethical Economy, Bind 57). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15407-3_6