Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

We explore the dynamic process of personal space invasion in collaborative design, and the consequences thereof on team micro-conflicts, minute disagreements in behaviour. Our topic of interest is the pattern of collaboration and micro-conflicts, herein specifically the moments when the teamwork involves physical overcrossing of personal space when conducting physical co-design with LEGO bricks. To study microconflicts in the collaborative practice of teams, we surveyed nine high-school student teams’ activity by coding captured video of their joint activities during a well-defined and an ill-defined LEGO task. Using mixed research methods, we identify the characteristics of micro-conflicts and investigate the relationship between micro-conflicts and personal space invasion. The results suggest that increased patterns of crossing personal space can provoke micro-conflicts during teamwork. But our qualitative results also demonstrate how crossing personal space can be moderated by invitations or requests during collaborative tasks. The results inform the use and design of tools and settings for co-designing for educational and professional purposes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelPapers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference : The Allure of the Digital and Beyond
RedaktørerGary Pritchard, Nick Lambert
Antal sider9
Udgivelses stedNorth Greenwich
ForlagRavensbourne Publications
Publikationsdato2017
Sider77-85
ISBN (Trykt)9781999833107
StatusUdgivet - 2017
BegivenhedLearn x Design 2017: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond. - London, Storbritannien
Varighed: 27 jun. 201730 jun. 2017
Konferencens nummer: 4

Konference

KonferenceLearn x Design 2017
Nummer4
LandStorbritannien
ByLondon
Periode27/06/201730/06/2017

Emneord

  • Personal space
  • Conflict
  • Collaboration
  • Creative teamwork
  • Co-design

Citer dette

Abildgaard, S. J. J., & Christensen, B. (2017). Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design. I G. Pritchard, & N. Lambert (red.), Papers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond (s. 77-85). North Greenwich: Ravensbourne Publications.
Abildgaard, Sille Julie Jøhnk ; Christensen, Bo. / Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design. Papers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond. red. / Gary Pritchard ; Nick Lambert. North Greenwich : Ravensbourne Publications, 2017. s. 77-85
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Abildgaard, SJJ & Christensen, B 2017, Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design. i G Pritchard & N Lambert (red), Papers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond. Ravensbourne Publications, North Greenwich, s. 77-85, Learn x Design 2017, London, Storbritannien, 27/06/2017.

Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design. / Abildgaard, Sille Julie Jøhnk; Christensen, Bo.

Papers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond. red. / Gary Pritchard; Nick Lambert. North Greenwich : Ravensbourne Publications, 2017. s. 77-85.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

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Abildgaard SJJ, Christensen B. Personal Space Invasion in Collaborative Design. I Pritchard G, Lambert N, red., Papers from the LearnX Design London 2017 Conference: The Allure of the Digital and Beyond. North Greenwich: Ravensbourne Publications. 2017. s. 77-85