Organising through Compassion: The Introduction of Meta-virtue Management in the NHS

Kirstine Z. Pedersen*, Anne Roelsgaard Obling

*Kontaktforfatter af dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper investigates the comprehensive compassionate care reform programme within the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Through a synoptic reading of policy documents, we show how ‘compassion’ is introduced as an overarching meta‐virtue designed to govern relationships and formal positions in health care. Invoking an ‘ethics of office’ perspective, mainly drawing on the thinking of Max Weber, we evaluate the promotion of compassion as a managerial technology and argue how seemingly humanistic and value‐based approaches to healthcare management might have unintended consequences for the quality of care and the conduct of health professionals that in some ways resemble and in some ways exceed those of the more traditional New Public Management measures, which the new compassion paradigm is expected to outdo. In the paper's final sections, we turn to the original work of the nursing icon Florence Nightingale to argue that compassion and other virtues should continuously be formulated and re‐formulated in relation to the role‐specific skills and duties of particular offices in the healthcare sector.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSociology of Health and Illness
Vol/bind41
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)1338-1357
Antal sider20
ISSN0141-9889
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2019

Bibliografisk note

Published online: 24. April 2019

Emneord

  • Compassion
  • Healthcare management
  • Max Weber
  • The ethics of office
  • Florence Nightingale

Citer dette

@article{3ad71880a4de48ee9539a125b8ebafa9,
title = "Organising through Compassion: The Introduction of Meta-virtue Management in the NHS",
abstract = "This paper investigates the comprehensive compassionate care reform programme within the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Through a synoptic reading of policy documents, we show how ‘compassion’ is introduced as an overarching meta‐virtue designed to govern relationships and formal positions in health care. Invoking an ‘ethics of office’ perspective, mainly drawing on the thinking of Max Weber, we evaluate the promotion of compassion as a managerial technology and argue how seemingly humanistic and value‐based approaches to healthcare management might have unintended consequences for the quality of care and the conduct of health professionals that in some ways resemble and in some ways exceed those of the more traditional New Public Management measures, which the new compassion paradigm is expected to outdo. In the paper's final sections, we turn to the original work of the nursing icon Florence Nightingale to argue that compassion and other virtues should continuously be formulated and re‐formulated in relation to the role‐specific skills and duties of particular offices in the healthcare sector.",
keywords = "Compassion, Healthcare management, Max Weber, The ethics of office, Florence Nightingale, Compassion, Healthcare management, Max Weber, The ethics of office, Florence Nightingale",
author = "Pedersen, {Kirstine Z.} and {Roelsgaard Obling}, Anne",
note = "Published online: 24. April 2019",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/1467-9566.12945",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "1338--1357",
journal = "Sociology of Health and Illness",
issn = "0141-9889",
publisher = "Blackwell Publishing",
number = "7",

}

Organising through Compassion : The Introduction of Meta-virtue Management in the NHS. / Pedersen, Kirstine Z.; Roelsgaard Obling, Anne.

I: Sociology of Health and Illness, Bind 41, Nr. 7, 09.2019, s. 1338-1357.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Organising through Compassion

T2 - The Introduction of Meta-virtue Management in the NHS

AU - Pedersen, Kirstine Z.

AU - Roelsgaard Obling, Anne

N1 - Published online: 24. April 2019

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - This paper investigates the comprehensive compassionate care reform programme within the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Through a synoptic reading of policy documents, we show how ‘compassion’ is introduced as an overarching meta‐virtue designed to govern relationships and formal positions in health care. Invoking an ‘ethics of office’ perspective, mainly drawing on the thinking of Max Weber, we evaluate the promotion of compassion as a managerial technology and argue how seemingly humanistic and value‐based approaches to healthcare management might have unintended consequences for the quality of care and the conduct of health professionals that in some ways resemble and in some ways exceed those of the more traditional New Public Management measures, which the new compassion paradigm is expected to outdo. In the paper's final sections, we turn to the original work of the nursing icon Florence Nightingale to argue that compassion and other virtues should continuously be formulated and re‐formulated in relation to the role‐specific skills and duties of particular offices in the healthcare sector.

AB - This paper investigates the comprehensive compassionate care reform programme within the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Through a synoptic reading of policy documents, we show how ‘compassion’ is introduced as an overarching meta‐virtue designed to govern relationships and formal positions in health care. Invoking an ‘ethics of office’ perspective, mainly drawing on the thinking of Max Weber, we evaluate the promotion of compassion as a managerial technology and argue how seemingly humanistic and value‐based approaches to healthcare management might have unintended consequences for the quality of care and the conduct of health professionals that in some ways resemble and in some ways exceed those of the more traditional New Public Management measures, which the new compassion paradigm is expected to outdo. In the paper's final sections, we turn to the original work of the nursing icon Florence Nightingale to argue that compassion and other virtues should continuously be formulated and re‐formulated in relation to the role‐specific skills and duties of particular offices in the healthcare sector.

KW - Compassion

KW - Healthcare management

KW - Max Weber

KW - The ethics of office

KW - Florence Nightingale

KW - Compassion

KW - Healthcare management

KW - Max Weber

KW - The ethics of office

KW - Florence Nightingale

UR - https://sfx-45cbs.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/45cbs?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&url_ctx_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_enc=info:ofi/enc:UTF-8&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rfr_id=info:sid/sfxit.com:azlist&sfx.ignore_date_threshold=1&rft.object_id=954925471355&rft.object_portfolio_id=&svc.holdings=yes&svc.fulltext=yes

U2 - 10.1111/1467-9566.12945

DO - 10.1111/1467-9566.12945

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85064803694

VL - 41

SP - 1338

EP - 1357

JO - Sociology of Health and Illness

JF - Sociology of Health and Illness

SN - 0141-9889

IS - 7

ER -