Keep Hoping, Keep Going

Towards a Hopeful Sociology of Creative Work

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article explores the relationship between future-oriented temporality and precarity in creative work. Existing sociological studies implicitly assume an unproblematic causal link between creative workers’ future-orientation and their precarity, subjugation and exploitation. This article problematizes this link and offers a more nuanced reassessment of creative work’s futurity by arguing for the analytical potential of the notion of hope in gaining a better understanding of creative workers’ hopeful – affective, practical and moral – responses to conditions of protracted precarity. Building on theories of hope, the article conceptualizes hope both as an existential affective stance and an active moral practice oriented towards the present – an orientation that enables workers to keep going in spite of economic hardship and job uncertainty. From ‘an atypical case’ study of creative work in South-East Europe, hope emerges empirically as the central quotidian practice of coping with precarity. Three practices of hope are discussed: (1) hope as therapeutic practice; (2) hope as informal labour practice; and (3) hope as socially engaged arts practice. In so doing, the article explores the possibilities of practising ‘a hopeful sociology’ of creative work.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSociological Review
Vol/bind67
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1118-1136
Antal sider19
ISSN0038-0261
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2019

Emneord

  • Creative industries
  • Creative work
  • Cultural work
  • Future
  • Futurity
  • Hope
  • Precarious labour
  • Precarity
  • Temporality
  • Time

Citer dette

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Keep Hoping, Keep Going : Towards a Hopeful Sociology of Creative Work. / Alacovska, Ana.

I: Sociological Review, Bind 67, Nr. 5, 09.2019, s. 1118-1136.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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