Is the Evidence for Hyperbolic Discounting in Humans just an Experimental Artefact?

Glenn W. Harrison, Morten Lau

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKommentar/debatForskningpeer review

Resumé

We question the behavioral premise underlying Ainslie's claims about hyperbolic discounting theory. The alleged evidence for humans can be easily explained as an artefact of experimental procedures that do not control for the credibility of payment over different time horizons. In appropriately controlled and financially motivated settings, human behavior is consistent with conventional exponential preferences.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)657
ISSN0140-525X
StatusUdgivet - 2005
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

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Is the Evidence for Hyperbolic Discounting in Humans just an Experimental Artefact? / Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten.

I: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Bind 28, Nr. 5, 2005, s. 657.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKommentar/debatForskningpeer review

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AU - Lau, Morten

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AB - We question the behavioral premise underlying Ainslie's claims about hyperbolic discounting theory. The alleged evidence for humans can be easily explained as an artefact of experimental procedures that do not control for the credibility of payment over different time horizons. In appropriately controlled and financially motivated settings, human behavior is consistent with conventional exponential preferences.

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 28

SP - 657

JO - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

JF - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

SN - 0140-525X

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