In the Name of Love: Let's Remember Desire

Anders Bojesen, Sara Louise Muhr

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The discourse of HRM has become subject to a code of love in which the organization expects employees to be fully committed and passionate about their work. This coded language reproduces the idea that there is one best way of managing the employee, only the employee is now expected to exhibit passion by being proactive, take initiative and anticipate the future needs of the organization. The code of love thus suggests an appropriating treatment to ensure the passionate self-managing employee. However, if it is true that passion has become a prerequisite for the working subject then the code of love should be made fragile, giving way to the unmanageable and desiring subject. Such a love would go beyond the beloved. It would not try to heal and appropriate the employee, but see the goodness in exposing the self to critical wounding. Love should therefore not be a striving for the same, but rather maintain the possibility for the beloved to retain a level of alterity. If not, the passion of organising risks falling prey to a state of paternal love and control where ethics is obsolete.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEphemera: Theory & politics in organization
Vol/bind8
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)79-93
ISSN1473-2866
StatusUdgivet - 2008
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

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In the Name of Love : Let's Remember Desire. / Bojesen, Anders; Muhr, Sara Louise.

I: Ephemera: Theory & politics in organization, Bind 8, Nr. 1, 2008, s. 79-93.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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