Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    This article surveys, organizes, and critically discusses the literature on the role of human resource practices for explaining innovation outcomes. We specifically put an emphasis on what is often called ‘new’ or ‘modern’ HRM practices—practices that imply high levels of delegation of decisions, extensive lateral and vertical communication channels, and the use of reward systems. We discuss how individual practices influence innovation, and how the clustering of specific practices matters for innovation, while drawing attention to the notion of complementarities between practices. Moreover, we discuss various possible moderators and mediators of the HRM/innovation link, such as the type of knowledge involved (tacit/codified), knowledge sharing, social capital, and network effects. We argue—despite substantial progress made in the pertinent literature—that the precise causal mechanisms underlying the HRM/innovation links remain poorly understood. Against this backdrop we suggest avenues for future research.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TitelThe Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management
    RedaktørerMark Dodgson, David M. Gann, Nelson Phillips
    Udgivelses stedOxford
    ForlagOxford University Press
    Publikationsdato2014
    Sider506-529
    Kapitel25
    ISBN (Trykt)9780199694945
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2014
    NavnOxford Handbooks in Business and Management

    Emneord

    • HRM practices
    • Complementarities
    • Delegation
    • Knowledge sharing
    • Incentitives
    • Innovation

    Citer dette

    Laursen, K., & Foss, N. J. (2014). Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation. I M. Dodgson, D. M. Gann, & N. Phillips (red.), The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management (s. 506-529). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199694945.013.009
    Laursen, Keld ; Foss, Nicolai Juul. / Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation. The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management. red. / Mark Dodgson ; David M. Gann ; Nelson Phillips. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014. s. 506-529 (Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management).
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    keywords = "HRM practices, Complementarities, Delegation, Knowledge sharing, Incentitives, Innovation",
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    Laursen, K & Foss, NJ 2014, Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation. i M Dodgson, DM Gann & N Phillips (red), The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management. Oxford University Press, Oxford, Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management, s. 506-529. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199694945.013.009

    Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation. / Laursen, Keld; Foss, Nicolai Juul.

    The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management. red. / Mark Dodgson; David M. Gann; Nelson Phillips. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014. s. 506-529 (Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management).

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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    Laursen K, Foss NJ. Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation. I Dodgson M, Gann DM, Phillips N, red., The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2014. s. 506-529. (Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management). https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199694945.013.009