Gotcha!

Findings from an Exploratory Investigation on the Dangers of Using Deceptive Practices in the Mail-Order Business

Joelle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This exploratory investigation examines the impact of some Belgian mail-order companies' deceptive practices—specifically, the use of gifts—on long-term relationships with their customers. The results support the premise that the use of deceptive gifts first elicits negative surprise and, subsequently, disappointment or even outrage. Deceptive gifts also seem to have a negative impact on the company's brand image and on the trust customers place in the company and its products. The results also suggest that the use of deceptive gifts hinders customer retention and customer loyalty. Moreover, deceptive gifts deprive the company of valuable advantages, such as preference for its products and positive perceptions of the company and its products, which could result from using non-deceptive gifts. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPsychology & Marketing
Vol/bind18
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)785-810
Antal sider26
ISSN0742-6046
StatusUdgivet - 2001
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

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Gotcha! Findings from an Exploratory Investigation on the Dangers of Using Deceptive Practices in the Mail-Order Business. / Vanhamme, Joelle; Lindgreen, Adam.

I: Psychology & Marketing, Bind 18, Nr. 7, 2001, s. 785-810.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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