From Reagan to Trump: The Origins of US Neoliberal Protectionism

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Resumé

Donald Trump is often seen as a radical departure from the neoliberalism that has shaped recent American history and, at first glance, nowhere does this seem truer than on trade. Trump’s support for protectionism certainly seems to depart from neoliberalism, which we are used to thinking of as involving unqualified support for free trade. But should this really be seen as a departure? This paper argues that, instead, Trump’s trade policy should be seen a kind of ‘neoliberal protectionism’, which seeks to use the coercive power of the state to force other nations to conform to a market‐based economic logic. The origins of this neoliberal protectionism can be traced back to the 1980s when debates about foreign industrial policies first caused the United States to adopt a more aggressive approach to trade. From this perspective, Trump’s trade policy represents not a rejection of neoliberalism but an extreme articulation of it.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPolitical Quarterly
Vol/bind90
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)735-742
Antal sider8
ISSN0032-3179
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2019

Emneord

  • Trump
  • Reagan
  • Neoliberalism
  • Protectionism
  • Industrial policy

Citer dette

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From Reagan to Trump : The Origins of US Neoliberal Protectionism. / Wraight, Tom.

I: Political Quarterly, Bind 90, Nr. 4, 10.2019, s. 735-742.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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