Freedom to Compete? The Cartelization of European Transnational Corporations

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) have been driving forces behind promoting policies aimed at protecting and further intensifying competition in global markets. This article aims to examine the extent to which leading European TNCs that have promoted such policies have been involved in cartels. To this end, the article focuses on companies associated with the European Roundtable of Industrialists (ERT), a highly influential network consisting of top executives from a range of Europe’s largest TNCs that has consistently urged political decision-makers to give companies the ‘freedom to compete’. We find that a third of these companies were convicted for participating in cartels between 1990 and 2010. Drawing on critical political economy scholarship, it is concluded that this behaviour may not be paradoxical.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftCompetition and Change
    Vol/bind16
    Udgave nummer1
    Sider (fra-til)20-36
    Antal sider17
    ISSN1024-5294
    StatusUdgivet - 2012

    Bibliografisk note

    Embargo 1år (2012).

    Citer dette

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    title = "Freedom to Compete?: The Cartelization of European Transnational Corporations",
    abstract = "Transnational corporations (TNCs) have been driving forces behind promoting policies aimed at protecting and further intensifying competition in global markets. This article aims to examine the extent to which leading European TNCs that have promoted such policies have been involved in cartels. To this end, the article focuses on companies associated with the European Roundtable of Industrialists (ERT), a highly influential network consisting of top executives from a range of Europe’s largest TNCs that has consistently urged political decision-makers to give companies the ‘freedom to compete’. We find that a third of these companies were convicted for participating in cartels between 1990 and 2010. Drawing on critical political economy scholarship, it is concluded that this behaviour may not be paradoxical.",
    keywords = "Cartels , Transnational Corporations, European Roundtable of Industrialists, Competition",
    author = "Hubert Buch-Hansen",
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    Freedom to Compete? The Cartelization of European Transnational Corporations. / Buch-Hansen, Hubert.

    I: Competition and Change, Bind 16, Nr. 1, 2012, s. 20-36.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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    N2 - Transnational corporations (TNCs) have been driving forces behind promoting policies aimed at protecting and further intensifying competition in global markets. This article aims to examine the extent to which leading European TNCs that have promoted such policies have been involved in cartels. To this end, the article focuses on companies associated with the European Roundtable of Industrialists (ERT), a highly influential network consisting of top executives from a range of Europe’s largest TNCs that has consistently urged political decision-makers to give companies the ‘freedom to compete’. We find that a third of these companies were convicted for participating in cartels between 1990 and 2010. Drawing on critical political economy scholarship, it is concluded that this behaviour may not be paradoxical.

    AB - Transnational corporations (TNCs) have been driving forces behind promoting policies aimed at protecting and further intensifying competition in global markets. This article aims to examine the extent to which leading European TNCs that have promoted such policies have been involved in cartels. To this end, the article focuses on companies associated with the European Roundtable of Industrialists (ERT), a highly influential network consisting of top executives from a range of Europe’s largest TNCs that has consistently urged political decision-makers to give companies the ‘freedom to compete’. We find that a third of these companies were convicted for participating in cartels between 1990 and 2010. Drawing on critical political economy scholarship, it is concluded that this behaviour may not be paradoxical.

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