Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Value Chains

Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going?

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    We outline the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the compliance paradigm. We then use a similar structure to investigate the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the cooperative paradigm for working with CSR in global value chains. We argue that the measures proposed in the new cooperation paradigm are unlikely to alter power relationships in global value chains and bring about sustained improvements in workers’ conditions in developing country export industries. After that, we provide a critical appraisal of the potential and limits of the cooperative paradigm, we summarize our findings, and we outline avenues for research: purchasing practices and labor standard noncompliance, CSR capacity building among local suppliers, and improved CSR monitoring by local resources in the developing world.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftJournal of Business Ethics
    Vol/bind123
    Udgave nummer1
    Sider (fra-til)11-22
    Antal sider12
    ISSN0167-4544
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2014

    Emneord

    • Compliance paradigm
    • Cooperative paradigm
    • Corporate social responsibility
    • Global value chains

    Citer dette

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    title = "Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Value Chains: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going?",
    abstract = "We outline the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the compliance paradigm. We then use a similar structure to investigate the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the cooperative paradigm for working with CSR in global value chains. We argue that the measures proposed in the new cooperation paradigm are unlikely to alter power relationships in global value chains and bring about sustained improvements in workers’ conditions in developing country export industries. After that, we provide a critical appraisal of the potential and limits of the cooperative paradigm, we summarize our findings, and we outline avenues for research: purchasing practices and labor standard noncompliance, CSR capacity building among local suppliers, and improved CSR monitoring by local resources in the developing world.",
    keywords = "Compliance paradigm, Cooperative paradigm, Corporate social responsibility, Global value chains",
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    Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Value Chains : Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going? . / Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Lindgreen, Adam.

    I: Journal of Business Ethics, Bind 123, Nr. 1, 2014, s. 11-22.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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    KW - Corporate social responsibility

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