Conflict: Organizational

Stewart Clegg, Elisabeth Naima Mikkelsen, Graham Sewell

Publikation: Kapitel i bog/rapport/konferenceprocesEncyclopædiartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article examines four contemporary treatments of the problem of organizational conflict: social psychological, anthropological, neo-Darwinian, and neo-Machiavellian. Social psychological treatments of organizational conflict focus on the dyadic relationship between individual disputants. In contrast, anthropological treatments take a more socially and historically embedded approach to organizational conflict, focusing on how organizational actors establish negotiated orders of understanding. In a break with the social psychological and anthropological approaches, neo-Darwinians explain the characteristics of organizational conflict by appealing to the concept of natural selection: all forms of organizational behavior, including conflictual relations, stem from the effects of heritable traits associated with a universal human nature. Finally, this article proposes a neo-Machiavellian view of organizational conflict where members of an organization are seen as politicized actors engaged in power struggles that continually ebb and flow.
This article examines four contemporary treatments of the problem of organizational conflict: social psychological, anthropological, neo-Darwinian, and neo-Machiavellian. Social psychological treatments of organizational conflict focus on the dyadic relationship between individual disputants. In contrast, anthropological treatments take a more socially and historically embedded approach to organizational conflict, focusing on how organizational actors establish negotiated orders of understanding. In a break with the social psychological and anthropological approaches, neo-Darwinians explain the characteristics of organizational conflict by appealing to the concept of natural selection: all forms of organizational behavior, including conflictual relations, stem from the effects of heritable traits associated with a universal human nature. Finally, this article proposes a neo-Machiavellian view of organizational conflict where members of an organization are seen as politicized actors engaged in power struggles that continually ebb and flow.
SprogEngelsk
TitelInternational Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences
RedaktørerJames D. Wright
Vol/bind2
Udgivelses stedAmsterdam
ForlagElsevier
Dato2015
Udgave2.
Sider639–643
ISBN (Trykt)9780080970875
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Emneord

  • Culture
  • Dyadic conflict
  • Ethnography
  • Natural selection
  • Negotiated order
  • Negotiation
  • Neo-Darwinian
  • Neo-Machiavellian
  • Political competence
  • Power
  • Social psychology

Citer dette

Clegg, S., Mikkelsen, E. N., & Sewell, G. (2015). Conflict: Organizational. I J. D. Wright (red.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2. udg., Bind 2, s. 639–643). Amsterdam: Elsevier. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1
Clegg, Stewart ; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima ; Sewell, Graham. / Conflict: Organizational. International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. red. / James D. Wright. Bind 2 2.udg. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2015. s. 639–643
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Clegg, S, Mikkelsen, EN & Sewell, G 2015, Conflict: Organizational. i JD Wright (red.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. 2. udg, bind 2, Elsevier, Amsterdam, s. 639–643. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1

Conflict: Organizational. / Clegg, Stewart; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Sewell, Graham.

International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. red. / James D. Wright. Bind 2 2.udg. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2015. s. 639–643.

Publikation: Kapitel i bog/rapport/konferenceprocesEncyclopædiartikelForskningpeer review

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Clegg S, Mikkelsen EN, Sewell G. Conflict: Organizational. I Wright JD, red., International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. 2. udg. Bind 2. Amsterdam: Elsevier. 2015. s. 639–643. Tilgængelig fra, DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1