Conflict: Organizational

Stewart Clegg, Elisabeth Naima Mikkelsen, Graham Sewell

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportEncyclopædiartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article examines four contemporary treatments of the problem of organizational conflict: social psychological, anthropological, neo-Darwinian, and neo-Machiavellian. Social psychological treatments of organizational conflict focus on the dyadic relationship between individual disputants. In contrast, anthropological treatments take a more socially and historically embedded approach to organizational conflict, focusing on how organizational actors establish negotiated orders of understanding. In a break with the social psychological and anthropological approaches, neo-Darwinians explain the characteristics of organizational conflict by appealing to the concept of natural selection: all forms of organizational behavior, including conflictual relations, stem from the effects of heritable traits associated with a universal human nature. Finally, this article proposes a neo-Machiavellian view of organizational conflict where members of an organization are seen as politicized actors engaged in power struggles that continually ebb and flow.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelInternational Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences
RedaktørerJames D. Wright
Vol/bind2
Udgivelses stedAmsterdam
ForlagElsevier
Publikationsdato2015
Udgave2.
Sider639–643
ISBN (Trykt)9780080970868
ISBN (Elektronisk)9780080970875
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Emneord

  • Culture
  • Dyadic conflict
  • Ethnography
  • Natural selection
  • Negotiated order
  • Negotiation
  • Neo-Darwinian
  • Neo-Machiavellian
  • Political competence
  • Power
  • Social psychology

Citer dette

Clegg, S., Mikkelsen, E. N., & Sewell, G. (2015). Conflict: Organizational. I J. D. Wright (red.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2. udg., Bind 2, s. 639–643). Amsterdam: Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1
Clegg, Stewart ; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima ; Sewell, Graham. / Conflict: Organizational. International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. red. / James D. Wright. Bind 2 2. udg. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2015. s. 639–643
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Clegg, S, Mikkelsen, EN & Sewell, G 2015, Conflict: Organizational. i JD Wright (red.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. 2. udg, bind 2, Elsevier, Amsterdam, s. 639–643. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1

Conflict: Organizational. / Clegg, Stewart; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Sewell, Graham.

International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. red. / James D. Wright. Bind 2 2. udg. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2015. s. 639–643.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportEncyclopædiartikelForskningpeer review

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Clegg S, Mikkelsen EN, Sewell G. Conflict: Organizational. I Wright JD, red., International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. 2. udg. Bind 2. Amsterdam: Elsevier. 2015. s. 639–643 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.96002-1