A Standard Fit for Neoliberalism

Peter Gibbon, Lasse Folke Henriksen

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Social scientists and historians writing on techniques of contemporary rule, particularly those influenced by post-Marxist paradigms such as governmentality, have become increasingly preoccupied by the expanding role of standardization and the subjection of an ever-expanding array of spheres of activity to inspection (or self-inspection), audit, and certification. In the course of their investigations, the elements of a common narrative are emerging. This links standardization, audit, and certification with neoliberalism and contraction of the state, on one hand, with a reconfiguration of everyday life in business, communication, and social provision on the other (see Power 1997; Brunsson and Jakobsen 2000; Strathern 2000; and Higgins and Larner 2010).
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftComparative Studies in Society and History
    Vol/bind54
    Udgave nummer2
    Sider (fra-til)275-307
    Antal sider33
    ISSN0010-4175
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2012

    Citer dette

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    A Standard Fit for Neoliberalism. / Gibbon, Peter; Henriksen, Lasse Folke .

    I: Comparative Studies in Society and History, Bind 54, Nr. 2, 2012, s. 275-307.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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    AU - Henriksen, Lasse Folke

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    AB - Social scientists and historians writing on techniques of contemporary rule, particularly those influenced by post-Marxist paradigms such as governmentality, have become increasingly preoccupied by the expanding role of standardization and the subjection of an ever-expanding array of spheres of activity to inspection (or self-inspection), audit, and certification. In the course of their investigations, the elements of a common narrative are emerging. This links standardization, audit, and certification with neoliberalism and contraction of the state, on one hand, with a reconfiguration of everyday life in business, communication, and social provision on the other (see Power 1997; Brunsson and Jakobsen 2000; Strathern 2000; and Higgins and Larner 2010).

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