A Review of Smartphone Applications Designed to Improve Occupational Health, Safety, and Well-being at Workplaces

Iben Louise Karlsen*, Peter Aske Svendsen, Johan Simonsen Abildgaard

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Abstract

Background: As smartphones become more widespread, software applications for occupational health, safety and well-being (OHS&W) at work are increasing. There is sparse knowledge about the available apps and the research evidence of their effects. This study aims to identify available smartphone applications designed to improve OHS&W at workplaces, and examine to what extent the apps are scientifically validated.
Methods: We searched the Danish App Store and Google Play for free OHS&W apps. Apps were included if they targeted OHS&W and were designed for workplace use. After categorizing the apps, we searched bibliographic databases to identify scientific studies on the ‘intervention apps’.
Results: Altogether, 57 apps were included in the study; 19 apps were categorized as digital sources of information, 37 apps contained an intervention designed for workplace changes, and one app had too sparse information to be classified. Based on the publicly available information about the 37 intervention apps, only 13 had references to research. The bibliographic database search returned 531 publications, resulting in four relevant studies referring to four apps aimed at ergonomic measures, noise exposure, and well-being, which showed either limited effect or methodological limitations.
Conclusion: There is no conceptual clarity about what can be categorized as an OHS&W app. Although some of the apps were developed based on scientific research, there is a need to evaluate the apps’ effects in promoting OHS&W. The sparse documentation of evidence should be kept in mind when applying apps to improve OHS&W.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer1520
TidsskriftBMC Public Health
Vol/bind22
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider13
ISSN1471-2458
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2022

Emneord

  • Apps
  • Smartphone applications
  • Occupational health
  • Well-being
  • Technology
  • Digital health
  • E-health
  • M-health

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