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DOI

This article explores the political differences between academic activism and the recently emerged research impact agenda. While both claim that academic work can and should engage with and influence the world beyond the academic ‘ivory tower’, their political meaning and practice are radically different. Following the distinction made by Jacques Rancière, we argue that research impact performs a policing function which, despite its own rhetoric, is arranged as an attempt to ensure that academic work maintains a neoliberal status quo by actually having no real political impact. Academic activism, in contrast, serves to politicize scholarly work by democratically disrupting political consensus in the name of equality. Being an academic activist in an era of research impact rests in a twofold movement: that of both acting in the name of equality in an effort (using Marx’s terms) to ‘change the world’ and resisting and contesting an academic administration whose police actions have attempted to eliminate such forms of democratic practice from the political consensus. The argument is illustrated with examples from the Australia Research Council’s statements on research impact and the practice of climate change activism.

Publikationsoplysninger

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftOrganization
Vol/bind25
Tidsskriftsnummer1
Sider (fra-til)139-147
Antal sider9
ISSN1350-5084
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

    Forskningsområder

  • Academic activism, Climate change activism, Neoliberalism, Research impact

ID: 56399523